Cutting a hole in the bass drum...How big, methods etc...

Drumz

Member
Go to any art supply or decorating store that sells Fiskars gear and buy the Fiskars Circle Cutter.

I bought mine on Amazon.


It's fully adjustable from 1" to 8".

Place your drum head on a hard surface...concrete is great like a garage floor or basement floor. Put the center of the Circle Cutter where you want the center of the hole. Press down the stopper and turn the blade. It will cut through the mylar like a hot knife through butter. Voila! Bass drum port!
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
For the price of a hole cutter, why would you spend the time to heat a can, handle with oven mitt, risk screwing up the hole, because you can't exactly measure and risk having it not work as intended? Give me a $7 hole cutter and I can cut a hole in less time than it takes to heat the can. I can also cut holes in all sizes and not have to look for a soup can, a big can of beans, a small coffee can, a big coffee can, a 50 gallon drum...

It's also really tough to find a port hole protector in the right size. They come in 4, 5 or 6" and not Soup can, Bush's Baked Beans, Coffee can sizes!
 

Mustion

Senior Member
Place your drum head on a hard surface...concrete is great like a garage floor or basement floor. Put the center of the Circle Cutter where you want the center of the hole. Press down the stopper and turn the blade. It will cut through the mylar like a hot knife through butter. Voila! Bass drum port!
Good idea, but I'd suggest something like newspaper underneath. Concrete can be textured which leads to cutting issues.
 

gdmoore28

Gold Member
Thanks for the reference, but that's not what I'm talking about. When it comes to drum ports, KickPorts, and other porting methods, we are literally flying blind as to the exact port size (and depth, if appropriate) that will result in maximum output at the desired frequencies. There are so many variables involved in actually tuning a bass drum via a port (drum diameter, depth, head(s) resonant frequencies, shell resonant frequencies, port placement) that this might be an unsolvable problem without a very complicated, all-inclusive formula.

Till then, we'll just have to be content with guessing our way thru the port scenario by using our best tool for now: experimentation.

GeeDeeEmm
 

Meter man

Member
I have destroyed 3 reso heads in the last 9 years trying to cut a hole. One was the hot can, then an exacto knife and most recently, the Bass O's cutting tool. I'm done. I am bad at it :(. Now, I just buy a pre-cut head with the reinforcement ring on it.
 

notvinnie

Senior Member
we are literally flying blind as to the exact port size (and depth, if appropriate) that will result in maximum output at the desired frequencies.
Dude! Don't over complicate things. Keep the hole small, but big enough for a mic (4 inches is fine) and as far from center as feasible. Simple.
 
I have destroyed 3 reso heads in the last 9 years trying to cut a hole. One was the hot can, then an exacto knife and most recently, the Bass O's cutting tool. I'm done. I am bad at it :(. Now, I just buy a pre-cut head with the reinforcement ring on it.
The Bass O's cutting tool sucks. The blade isn't nearly sharp enough.

The Fisker cutter looks like the answer though. Also, I cut my hole on the box the head came in.
 

iCe

Senior Member
I've always used an O-ring (Aquarian or the Evans one) type porthole; sticks to the head and you cut out the center. But lately I've been thinking of getting a new set of heads for my 2 bass drums and going with a 'no-ported' reso head. Thinking of going with clear Ambassadors batter and reso: been digging the sound recently!
 
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