Zildjian or Paiste?

No Way Jose

Silver Member
You are going to need cymbal stands also. Do you have any? Do you have a hi hat stand?
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
I wish Paiste and Zildjian wouldn't even bother with their inexpensive brands/sets. It's really a rip off because plenty of competitors sell that crap cheaper. They should stick to their good lines-why muddy the waters. I wish they would stick with a winning formula too-it's fine to build on a brand trying to improve and give it a new name but maintain that which drove your success. Minute changes can make a big difference and you can ruin something in the guise of improving it.
 

HansBal

Well-known member
Looked on our Dutch "Marketplace" for second hand cymbals but not many offers or way, way over budget...
 
Not sure about buying from the UK, but Brexit has made importing and exporting more complicated and there may be additional taxes.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
Not sure about buying from the UK, but Brexit has made importing and exporting more complicated and there may be additional taxes.
Yeah buying off thomann is a bit crappy in the UK at the moment.
 

petrez

Senior Member
I would definately check out Zultan at Thomann, seems like great cymbals for the price. Much better than going for the cheaper alternatives from the known brands.
 

jdavis

Member
When I was just starting out, my dad surprised me and bought me my first set of drums. Cymbals were expensive, so he didn't buy any.

After a few weeks (and destroying the lids to all of my mom's pots), he finally decided to buy some cheap off-brand cymbals from the Sears catalog. I broke them all within a week. At that point, he realized that the more he held off on buying quality cymbals, the more money he'd flush down the toilet on cheap stuff that wouldn't last very long.

Not long after that, my dad came home with a set of Paiste 2002s he bought from Pro Drum in Hollywood. That set of cymbals 1. would last me for years, 2. was a good foundation to expand on and 3. held a good resale value when it came time to eventually move on to other cymbals.

There's a LOT of good advice in this thread if you've got your eyes and ears open. Good luck! (y)
 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
When I was in high school I had quite a few friends that were drummers, and we did a fair amount of selling and trading among us. If your social circle has any drummers in it you might consider reaching out to them. I think every drummer has some piece of gear sitting around they'd sell or trade off to a friend.
 

Black page

Junior Member

SharkSandwich

Junior Member
I recommend you save your money and find some decent used cymbals.
You'll regret buying either of these pretty quickly.

Edit: The PST 5 cymbals are decent IMO.
 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member

Neal Pert

Well-known member
So, you want:
  1. New
  2. Same Brand
  3. Same Line
  4. Cheap
I fully endorse what everyone's saying about buying used professional grade cymbals if at all possible. However, if that's not something you want to do, I'd get the Paiste PST7s. Keep them clean-- wipe them off every now and then so they look new when you go to sell them. Those will get you through the first couple years of playing in your basement. But I'd immediately start saving your money to replace the PST7s one by one. If I had a choice between good drums and good cymbals, I'd choose good cymbals, always. I think most professional players would say the same. Cheap drums can be made to sound pretty great. Cheap cymbals can't.
 

iCe

Senior Member
Is this any good? They are bronze…

I assume you are either Dutch (like me) or Belgian since those are all sites in Dutch ;)

I'm one of the few that recommend getting a set when you start out, since you probably don't have a clue what sound you like or what sounds good etc.
I started out on a set of Paiste 302's (PST3's are more or less the equivalent of it) and at that point all the cymbals sounded the same to me. Took me a few years to figure out what i'd liked and didn't like.

PST5's are decent and think the PST7's are a great value as well, but if you want a nice sounding cymbal for the same amount: get the Zultan Rock Beat pack on Thomann. Been buying from them for almost 10 years and they never disappoint!

Feel free to drop me a message if you have any questions.
En dat mag ook gewoon in het Nederlands natuurlijk ;)
 

Chris Whitten

Well-known member
I'm one of the few that recommend getting a set when you start out, since you probably don't have a clue what sound you like or what sounds good etc.
That's why I suggested calling in to Purple Chord, a Dutch drum store with a huge selection of second hand quality cymbals. Play them all and take advice from the experienced store keeper. Even if one just buys a complete new cheaper set from Thomann, you are really no further forward in educating yourself on what a good cymbal sounds like, and what you might like. Before blowing your budget on a set of cheaper cymbals, go somewhere that has good second hand cymbals and play them all. Unless you can't be bothered.
 

makinao

Silver Member
I'd pass on both. If you want new, for a little more you can get this:

Otherwise, I'm with Chris Whitten to try Purple Chord. They're on Facebook.
 
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