Your book collection

toddbishop

Platinum Member
I don't have the Basic books from Rothman. But, I do know what you mean by overlap. I guess that's something that happens when one person writes so many books.

BTW - I ordered your book today. I look forward to seeing and playing through it.

Jeff
Hey, I received your book today! I'll play through as much of it as I can tonight-- it looks like it's going to be a great teaching aid, and it will probably help get some of the remaining "noise" out of my stroke. Nice work!

By the way everyone-- use USPS Priority whenever possible when buying online. This package arrived in Portland from Boston in two days-- they shipped it on Thursday. If it had gone UPS Ground or Fedex I would've been waiting until next Friday, probably through another bloody weekend due to the holiday.
 
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Anthony Amodeo

Guest
Hey, I received your book today! I'll play through as much of it as I can tonight-- it looks like it's going to be a great teaching aid, and it will probably help get some of the remaining "noise" out of my stroke. Nice work!

By the way everyone-- use USPS Priority whenever possible when buying online. This package arrived in Portland from Boston in two days-- they shipped it on Thursday. If it had gone UPS Ground or Fedex I would've been waiting until next Friday, probably through another bloody weekend due to the holiday.
Jeffs book is fantastic

my students are enjoying the improvements this book is giving their strokes....as am I

you will dig it
 

jeffwj

Platinum Member
Hey, I received your book today! I'll play through as much of it as I can tonight-- it looks like it's going to be a great teaching aid, and it will probably help get some of the remaining "noise" out of my stroke. Nice work!
Thanks - I hope you enjoy it! I got the confirmation that your book has been sent, so I should get it early next week.

Just curious - where did you order my book from?



Jeffs book is fantastic

my students are enjoying the improvements this book is giving their strokes....as am I

you will dig it
Thanks, I have been getting some great feedback. But the best compliment is hearing that the students like it and are benefiting from it.

Jeff
 
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Anthony Amodeo

Guest
Thanks, I have been getting some great feedback. But the best compliment is hearing that the students like it and are benefiting from it.

Jeff
the students love it Jeff

some of them thought I made up ...Full, Down, tap, up.........until they saw it in print...hahahaha

so in a way you helped validate something I always stress that some students thought was just me being a pain in the tail
:)
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
Jeff, I got is from Steve Weiss. And you know, it's harder than it looks-- or I didn't have that stuff together as well as I thought I did-- the notes are not difficult, but being fully conscious of the moves and doing them with absolute precision sure is. I'll definitely be hitting this every day for awhile and using it in lessons and my pad group. Nice work!
 

jeffwj

Platinum Member
Jeff, I got is from Steve Weiss. And you know, it's harder than it looks-- or I didn't have that stuff together as well as I thought I did-- the notes are not difficult, but being fully conscious of the moves and doing them with absolute precision sure is. I'll definitely be hitting this every day for awhile and using it in lessons and my pad group. Nice work!
That's the idea - most of what we play is not The Black Page. We often overlook the way we play everyday rhythms and stickings. Not to say that the book doesn't have its share of challenging exercises - it does. But the concepts in the book can (and should) be applied to any dynamic or accent studies.
 

jeffwj

Platinum Member
I also have a thing for books. I have to constantly be working out of one of them

Unfortunately, I pick and choose my way through most books so I can get on to the next.

So many books... So little time...
I think drummers should know some books very intimately - especially technique books, coordination books and books that you may teach out of. But then there are books that can be used for reference, inspiration or sight reading.

Jeff
 

dmacc_2

Well-known member
I'll need to gather my collection on paper, though I have many of the classics. Over the years I've sold a bunch too to students. I kept what was most meaningful to me at the time.
 

jeffwj

Platinum Member
Todd,

I got your book today. I really like the Lulu packaging. After opening up the cardboard mailer, it was plastic wrapped and secured onto a piece of cardboard.

The book looks great! I can tell that it was years of transcribing for you. I look forward to working on it. I also have to get some of the reference recordings. I can tell it will be an inspirational book for me to work on!

Jeff
 

jeffwj

Platinum Member
Man, there are some awesome members on this board! I feel small. :)
Welcome to the forum! No need to feel small. We all have something to contribute. Todd's book has a lot to contribute. I really should be at my set working on his transcriptions instead of surfing the forums!!!

Jeff
 

JBoom

Senior Member
Welcome to the forum! No need to feel small. We all have something to contribute. Todd's book has a lot to contribute. I really should be at my set working on his transcriptions instead of surfing the forums!!!

Jeff
Well, I have nothing professional to contribute, since I'm an amateur player (I make my living otherwise). But I certainly have no problem sharing my opinions!

Here are my favorite books on my shelf, some of which I've carried around for over 20 years.

*Progressive Steps To Syncopation, Ted Reed (my first book ever, required my my drum teacher)
*Fundamental Studies for Snare Drum, Garwood Whaley
*Modern Reading Text in 4/4, Louis Bellson, Gil Breines (Louie is my favorate drummer, even met him once)
*Odd Time Reading Text, Louis Bellson, Gil Breines
*Buddy Rich's Modern Interpretation Of Snare Drum Rudiments, Buddy Rich, Henry Adler
*Modern Jazz Drumming, Jim Chapin
*The Big Band Drummer, Ron Spagnardi
*Savage Rudimental Workshop, Matt Savage
*It's About Time, Fred Dinkins
*Four-way Independence for Rock Drumming, Joel Rothman
*Extreme Interdependence, Marco Minnemann, Rick Gratton
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
I still have way too many to list-- here's what I use regularly right now:

Snare drum:
Stick Control
Haskell Harr Drum Method, book 2
Odd Time Calisthenics by Mitchell Peters
Intermediate Snare Drum Studies by Mitchell Peters
Chop Busters by Ron Fink

Drum set:
Syncopation by Ted Reed
Syncopation in 3/4 by me
Patterns, vol. III, Time Functioning by Gary Chaffee
a whole lot of my own materials, much of it developing things found in the other books

Recent acquisitions include Dave Di Censo's time book, Techniques of Drumming by Stone, Lessons with G.L. Stone by Barry James, a draft of a technique book by a college friend, Kevin Super.
 
These ( and 3 or 4 I’m missing ) , are what I was working out of with a teacher from 1979 to around 83/84. Trying to work through them again , but I’ve forgotten how to read a lot of it except the basic stuff . But for now the basics are knocking off the rust and sharpening up the skills along with playing along to songs . Sorry for sideways pics . Not sure how/why that happens sometimes 🤷🏻‍♂️


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Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
There is only one book. The first page of Stick Control. Throw in some accents, play it linearly between the hands and feet, add some diddles and buzzes, French grip versus American/German, push-pull stroke, etc.. You could get 5 years of hour-a-day practice material out of that first page, with the additions I mentioned.
 
While I see your point that you can come up with endless exercises from a few sticking patterns and that it's a good technique builder, I disagree that you only need that page. This argument seems like "You only need the C Major scale - you can derive the rest from that".
Reading and interpreting notes and pauses, different styles of music, odd time signatures, mixed note values like triplets and 8ths, transcriptions, explanations and a structure of how and what to learn in which order... That's pretty hard to get from page one of Stick Control.
Say I'd like to work on jazz comping on the snare with triplets: I don't want to combine the first 6 notes of Exc. 1 and the the last 6 notes of Exc. 7 and play the left hand rhythm with a bunch of random accents to come up with one bar. Also, getting a third voice going is pretty awkward with binary "Right Left" information. If I can remember all of this stuff while practicing, I'm probably advanced enough to no longer need page one sitting on my note stand.
Also, a single lesson costs more than a book, so even if I only get a few things out of one book, I'd say it's worth it.
 
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