Why is everything that came from the blues...

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I would bet anything that when those old time folks used to play for a crowd there was all kinds of percussion sound going on, boots on the wooden floor, clapping and drunks beating on boxes. It's just not on the records.

I thought about that. Probably just really simple rhythms. Not a lot of linear 4-way independent polyrhythmic stuff across the bar line, although I could be wrong lol
 

Rock Salad

Junior Member
Probably not. lol but some of those dance steps can get fancy.
I don't think those old mics could handle a drum either, even if it was wanted. You can hear them maxing out even with a strong vocal, and i think they were "far miced."
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
Probably not. lol but some of those dance steps can get fancy.
I don't think those old mics could handle a drum either, even if it was wanted. You can hear them maxing out even with a strong vocal, and i think they were "far miced."

Blues drumming today is really simple and understated. There are some drums on some really old recordings, plenty of the early pop songs had drums. Granted, you couldn’t really hear bass drums at all, only higher-pitched stuff.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I'm not very steeped in blues. SRV, George Thorogood, ZZ Top. Are these even in line with what we are referring to as blues in this thread or no? I ask because these acts are more modern than not, but the drumming is pretty simple and straightforward.

BB King, Howlin Wolf, Muddy Waters, I have no background with. I'm not really sure what is considered real blues, and what is rock modified blues.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
...so much more drum-heavy and rhythmic than the blues?
Because of this album:
Black-Sabbath-Black-Sabbath-cover-art-ghostcultmag.jpg
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
It has to. It's easier to go fast going downhill than up! Besides, if it's all downhill from here, that's a good thing right?

What I’m saying is that Ozzy’s stuff still has broad appeal. Even people that don’t like more recent metal can enjoy his stuff. He is a brilliant songwriter. Most metal these days is too distorted to even understand what pitches are being played, the vocals are too distorted to understand, and the drum parts are athletic instead of musical.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I can understand that the loud, distorted metal has therapeutic value for some people. I just can’t take it for more than a few seconds at a time.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
What I’m saying is that Ozzy’s stuff still has broad appeal. Even people that don’t like more recent metal can enjoy his stuff. He is a brilliant songwriter. Most metal these days is too distorted to even understand what pitches are being played, the vocals are too distorted to understand, and the drum parts are athletic instead of musical.
No I get it. I look at it like this. In the early 80s, Ozzy was huge and Metallica was underground. They were fast, aggressive, loud, in your face, and damn ugly. Parents were scared of how their children might act because of them. Now they are tame. They get their own half-hour show on classic rock channels. They have become mainstream. It's not the music that has changed, but the people's attitudes about said music. It's no longer scary, evil, something to be worried about. So kids need something else to push the boundaries. And the music grows accordingly.

At some point, Cannibal Corpse is going to go the same way. It all does.
 

Rock Salad

Junior Member
Blues drumming today is really simple and understated. There are some drums on some really old recordings, plenty of the early pop songs had drums. Granted, you couldn’t really hear bass drums at all, only higher-pitched stuff.

My friend, you have to check out Cedric Burnside on his own or formerly with his uncle R.L. Burnside. Subdued it is not, still, more authentic than almost everyone else.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
Off topic, but answers a lot of questions for me:


For the look of the cover, he used Kodak infrared aerochrome film, which was designed for aerial photographs and gave the portrait its pinkish hue. (You can see a similar look on the first album cover he designed, Colosseum’s Valentyne Suite.) Later on, he did “a little bit of tweaking in the chemistry to get that slightly dark, surrealistic, evil kind of feeling to it.” Since it was sensitive film, he’d boil it and then freeze it, to make the image grainy and undefined.
 
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