What do bass players wish more drummers knew?

JimmyM

Silver Member
Two things...I wish more drummers understood dynamics doesn't just mean "can you play louder?" I do like a drummer who slams when appropriate, but since Nirvana, so many rock drummers have two volumes...quiet and insanely loud.

I also wish we understood each other's roles a little better. I think knowing how to drum gave me a leg up on communicating with them, but I wish more of them played a chordal or melodic instrument as well, or at least knew something about them. And I wish more bassists knew how to play drums.
 

JimmyM

Silver Member
Who really cares?
I know a fantastic drummer who has that attitude, and despite how awesome he is, he has a very hard time getting gigs as a result. He used to get great gigs till word got out.
 

Quai34

Junior Member
Two things...I wish more drummers understood dynamics doesn't just mean "can you play louder?" I do like a drummer who slams when appropriate, but since Nirvana, so many rock drummers have two volumes...quiet and insanely loud.

I also wish we understood each other's roles a little better. I think knowing how to drum gave me a leg up on communicating with them, but I wish more of them played a chordal or melodic instrument as well, or at least knew something about them. And I wish more bassists knew how to play drums.
Well, you Are generous when you say "Quiet...and super loud...". I would said "zero volume...when they are still not here at the practice".... And super loud as soon as they put their ass in the seat!!!!
Ok, I had a drummer who was really loud but he knew how to play soft when asked...
Yes for musical training, reading their instrument or at least a bit more of chords or stuff like that. Even aith rhythm, sometimes, when you told them "we start in the on the last beat of the Bb in the bridge", they have no idea where we are at...
Not a big deal for me, I told them, after the 4 bars of verse, after your 16th on the hat, you just asked.
 

Soulfinger

Senior Member
sometimes, when you told them "we start in the on the last beat of the Bb in the bridge", they have no idea where we are at...
That´s a bit of a tall order, don´t you think? How are they supposed to know where Bb is in the bridge (unless they have the sheet music)?
I´ve played the majority of my current jazz band´s repertoire in the past when I was playing trumpet or bass but I no longer know the chord progressions by heart. I mean, I know where Bb is in an F blues, but not where it is in "Invitation" (or if there is a Bb at all :) ).
I agree with the musical training concept though - it´s always good to know other instruments and different kinds of music.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Quantum mechanics lol.

In my own personal experience:
How to drive
More weed dealers
The closest liquor store
How to fix things
What time it is
Whether or not we have practice today

In all fairness our bass player was a converted guitar player, so these might be more guitar player needs than bass player.
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
Quantum mechanics lol.

In my own personal experience:
How to drive
More weed dealers
The closest liquor store
How to fix things
What time it is
Whether or not we have practice today

In all fairness our bass player was a converted guitar player, so these might be more guitar player needs than bass player.
Your bass player would love it here in Canada. Weed is legal and stores that sell it are as common as gas stations.
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
How to effectively use empty space as opposed to having to hit something. I know as a bass player I would want a drummer to know this.
This is not necessarily about over playing but rather note (or no note) selection.
 

Quai34

Junior Member
That´s a bit of a tall order, don´t you think? How are they supposed to know where Bb is in the bridge (unless they have the sheet music)?
I´ve played the majority of my current jazz band´s repertoire in the past when I was playing trumpet or bass but I no longer know the chord progressions by heart. I mean, I know where Bb is in an F blues, but not where it is in "Invitation" (or if there is a Bb at all :) ).
I agree with the musical training concept though - it´s always good to know other instruments and different kinds of music.
I make the sheet music for them, they have the drums score plus the chords and even the lyrics if they want...Is just that, most of them don't even want to learn the songs and its quirks and would like to play "their stuff"...For the most part of those I met though...I'm sure all the good drummers are on DW!!!😊
 

jimb

Member
Well as a bass player let me tell you...haha kidding. But seriously. Keep the solos short and tight as possible. You've no idea how boring it all sounds three feet to the left. Oh, and need I say, try to keep time?
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Platinum Member
have been playing drums for 40ish years...hve been playing bass for 30ish...

my biggest complaints are:
- when the drummer's limbs are not communicating with each other on the subdivision
- when the bass drum is louder/softer than the hands, and vice-versa
- when it takes them too long to let a part settle in <-- this is for original bands mostly

I think these are complaints more b/c I know how to fix them, but don't want to become "the band director" fixing mistakes, since that is my instinct

I think I am pretty good at reading and anticipating what a drummer is going to do because of being one myself, so I am usually able to quickly adjust, and find my role

I also don't like when a drummer tries to "fit stereotypes" by;
- worrying about being too loud/soft
- worrying about being too busy/not busy enough
- worrying about having a certain amount of gear or "the right" gear
- worrying about "being tight with the bass player"

I think these things cause players to become cautious, and then they don't ever really fit in to the picture correctly. Just play what comes from the heart. Things will sift out. I would rather the drummer be a bit brash first, and then pull back as the dust settles.
 

caddywumpus

Archnemesis of Larryace
How to groove with each other. As a bass player AND drummer, it bugs me when I play with somebody who thinks that “locking in” the rhythm sections means that the bass and bass drum have to play the same rhythm. Often times the tastiest grooves result from playing different rhythms—the way they play against/in spite of each other determines how deep the pocket is.
 
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