Vacuum style practice pad ???

johnwesley

Silver Member
Never used one but curious about those who have and what you think. Any benefit over those stand alone pads? Do they feel more like a drum head? I haven't been able to get to my studio (21 miles away) because of this virus crap. Help !!!!
 

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C.M. Jones

Well-known member
I sampled one many, many years ago and don't recall being drawn to it, nor was I repulsed. It looks as though it can also be suctioned to a snare head. I presume that would give you a muted effect with plenty of bounce while maintaining a modicum of authentic sound.

I've never been a fan of rubber pads. For instance, the Evans Real Feel, which is very popular, has never done it for me. I've always used a classic Remo pad, which has a tunable (more like adjustable) head. It sounds and feels more percussive to me than a rubber pad. I guess I also have a sentimental attachment to it.

I'm a big proponent of practice-pad sessions. Life is much simpler when you've got your rudiments down.
 

beatdat

Senior Member
It looks like the one my teacher has. If I recall, it's a hard pad with little absorption. Personally, I didn't care for it, but my teacher can fly on it - then again he can play on anything, so what do I know?

If you're looking to pick up a pad, check out the Prologix Blue Lightning. I've had mine for six months and I haven't practiced on anything else. It has a lot less rebound than most pads, but is not at all dead. I find it also promotes good technique (you'll feel the shock otherwise). When played well, it has the best feel of any pad I've ever played. My teacher really likes it too.
 

johnwesley

Silver Member
I sampled one many, many years ago and don't recall being drawn to it, nor was I repulsed. It looks as though it can also be suctioned to a snare head. I presume that would give you a muted effect with plenty of bounce while maintaining a modicum of authentic sound.

I've never been a fan of rubber pads. For instance, the Evans Real Feel, which is very popular, has never done it for me. I've always used a classic Remo pad, which has a tunable (more like adjustable) head. It sounds and feels more percussive to me than a rubber pad. I guess I also have a sentimental attachment to it.

I'm a big proponent of practice-pad sessions. Life is much simpler when you've got your rudiments down.
I have a 12 inch Remo tunable pad but use it very little. Just doesn't feel like a drum. Was hoping the vacuum pad placed on a real snare drum would feel more natural. Guess the only way to find out id buy one and give it a try.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
I have a 12 inch Remo tunable pad but use it very little. Just doesn't feel like a drum. Was hoping the vacuum pad placed on a real snare drum would feel more natural. Guess the only way to find out id buy one and give it a try.
I know what you mean. A lot of guys dislike Remo pads. It's what I started taking lessons on many years ago, so it's mostly a matter of tradition with me.

Really, the vacuum pad looks curiously versatile. Give it a try. If you hate it, it's just a pad, not a $400.00 set of hi-hats. Getting those and hating them would be quite a predicament.
 

Seafroggys

Silver Member
It just reminds me of middle school. All the snares had that pad on it so you can practice on a 'drum' without making noise. Even my first snare (still have it!) came with one of those!
 

johnwesley

Silver Member
I know what you mean. A lot of guys dislike Remo pads. It's what I started taking lessons on many years ago, so it's mostly a matter of tradition with me.

Really, the vacuum pad looks curiously versatile. Give it a try. If you hate it, it's just a pad, not a $400.00 set of hi-hats. Getting those and hating them would be quite a predicament.
I can't tell you how many cymbals, drums, hardware etc. I've bought online only to find I didn't like it then resold at a loss. I'll let you know if I get one of those vacuum pads.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
Those are the traditional Gladstone pads.

The vacuum part just means it sticks to the head and won't move around. Since it covers the entire head it dampends it fully. Has little to do with the feel of the thing.

Metal with rubber. If you you've played a Billy Hyde it's pretty close to that.


People will disagree about things feeling real. It's about you your techniqe, how you tune etc...

Problem wit the Remos is really their volume.

Personally, I've settled on a Xymox laminate. I have some Moongels for lower rebound and a Reflexx mainly for quiet practice. I've got lots of pads and the regular rubber ones hardly see any use anymore.
 

adamosmianski

Senior Member
That was my first pad. I wouldn't say it feels more like a drum head just because it sits on a drum head. Even though they're made of rubber they're definitely less lively that something like a RealFeel. I seem to remember it being somewhat inconsistent; harder in some spots and softer in others which made it a little tricky. Plus because you pretty much have to put it on a snare drum to use it it still makes a fair bit of noise.
 
I feel like all I'm doing here right now is sharing this guy's videos but so be it. :D
I like Sabian's Quiet Tone but there are lots of other models I haven't tried yet.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
I feel like all I'm doing here right now is sharing this guy's videos but so be it. :D
I like Sabian's Quiet Tone but there are lots of other models I haven't tried yet.

I watched a lot of Rick's vids lately. Thanks for introducing him.

He seems to have found what works for him, but there are obviously a lot of similar choices.

The Quiet Tone, traditional remos, Super-Pads, Xymox and many pads that have the option of laying a laminate on top of the rubber all have a similar quality that gets you closer to a real head. The common factor is some sort of film on top of softer material. This is what provides what I'd consider a more real head type of feel. Both that and the fact that they're slick like a head and don't grip the tip of the stick in an unnatural way.

Even the Moongel, with it's low rebound provides a bit of that feel and attack.

There are designs that I haven't seen yet, like a high quality mesh head with some dampening. Not sure how much better it would be, though.
 

Jeremy Bender

Platinum Member
OP I still have one of those from my high school days and it's like playing on a brick with a condom stretched over it.

My favorite practice pad I ever had was a gum rubber pad that was vanilla colored but I can't find one anywhere. I was travelling and went to lunch for a couple of hours, hotel housekeeping came in and decided my stickbag and practice pad needed an new owner. Sigh...
 
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C.M. Jones

Well-known member
Problem with the Remos is really their volume.
That's only a problem if you're seeking silent practice; it's a plus if you're not. The Remo pad is advantageously unforgiving in its feedback. If your strokes lack evenness (for instance, when you're practicing a pattern from "Stick Control for the Snare Drummer"), the Remo pad screams at you. Rubber pads, on the contrary, are mostly muted, allowing you to slip by with slovenly execution. You can still rely upon feel to assess your strokes, which is a valid approach, but some rubber pads lack auditory communication. So yeah, if you're practicing at midnight while others in your home are sleeping, the Remo pad can be a nuisance. Otherwise, I see its volume as its greatest asset.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
That's only a problem if you're seeking silent practice; it's a plus if you're not. The Remo pad is advantageously unforgiving in its feedback. If your strokes lack evenness (for instance, when you're practicing a pattern from "Stick Control for the Snare Drummer"), the Remo pad screams at you. Rubber pads, on the contrary, are mostly muted, allowing you to slip by with slovenly execution. You can still rely upon feel to assess your strokes, which is a valid approach, but some rubber pads lack auditory communication. So yeah, if you're practicing at midnight while others in your home are sleeping, the Remo pad can be a nuisance. Otherwise, I see its volume as its greatest asset.

That's another reason the Xymox is the best of both worlds for me. Very different price, though.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
That's another reason the Xymox is the best of both worlds for me. Very different price, though.
Yeah, Xymox gets strong reviews overall. It seems really versatile and high quality. As I explained in a previous post, I just have warm and fuzzy memories of the Remo pad. It reminds me of my formative days as a drummer.
 

Neilage

Junior Member
My first drum ever was an Acrolite that I played in grade school band in the early '80s.
It came in a UFO case with a Ludwig vacuum practice pad.
IMHO, the rubber technology is outdated in comparison to today's practice pads.

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RickP

Gold Member
Ludwig changed the rubber composition when they bought the design of the pad from Billy Gladstone
 
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