Tuning question (simple question, don't worry)

Stroman

Platinum Member
Maybe you missed one of the actual questions in my reply, that you just replied to: "How does A (3rd octave) and E (3rd octave) result in A (2nd octave)?" I'm not saying it's wrong, just that I don't understand how you get A note from tuning each of the heads to different notes than the one you want? Trying to learn something here. :)
Check out the Tune-Bot tuning guide. It tells you what fundamental the drum produces when the two heads are tuned to certain, different notes.
 

sillypilot

Junior Member
Maybe you missed one of the actual questions in my reply, that you just replied to: "How does A (3rd octave) and E (3rd octave) result in A (2nd octave)?" I'm not saying it's wrong, just that I don't understand how you get A note from tuning each of the heads to different notes than the one you want? Trying to learn something here. :)
That is what I'm trying to learn too, so we're both on the quest!! I know the "musical formulas", but I don't fully know the physics as to why it works that way. If someone here knows the physics that would be swell. It has to do with the different rate of vibrations of the different heads and how they either amplify certain frequencies or cancel them out gives you the fundamental. Since each head starts vibrating at a different point in time, the waves don't fully line up to just amplify that one frequency. I suspect that this offset of the waves causes some of the amplification of the harmonics as well as the cancellation of other harmonics and give you a "predominant" frequency that is the note we all hear. But I don't know the math behind it to prove it. I'd love to test it with a 1" deep drum vs. a 9" deep drum (same diameter) and see how different the fundamental is from each other.

I've found this on google, but it still isn't clear to me math wise..

 
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