The French Frise - Video on French Rudiments

SVBJECT

Well-known member
Can't help but notice, despite playing a very french style of drumming, you're not in french grip. Is that deliberate? Just cos that's how you have always played?
 

Mighty_Joker

Silver Member
Can't help but notice, despite playing a very french style of drumming, you're not in french grip. Is that deliberate? Just cos that's how you have always played?

Interesting point. I definitely don’t use what is called French grip, and actually, as I’ve studied elements of French drumming, I’m not convinced there is much French about it. It’s more of a timpani grip.

The players mentioned in this video like Raynaud, Goute, and Lefevre, held the sticks in more of a Swiss style, with full fists, rather than anything resembling what we today call French grip.
 

pgm554

Platinum Member
Reminds me of the Napoleonic era movies of the 40's and 50's.
Time to break out the muskets and cannons.
I do similar warmups using inverted six stroke roles using doubles and singles.
Small world ,eh?
 

Mighty_Joker

Silver Member
Reminds me of the Napoleonic era movies of the 40's and 50's.
Time to break out the muskets and cannons.
I do similar warmups using inverted six stroke roles using doubles and singles.
Small world ,eh?

Funny you should say that. These are quite literally Napoleonic. The military marches and regiments that played them did exist in Napoleonic times.
 

Alain Rieder

Silver Member
The so called "French" technique was taught to me by American drummer Billy Brooks, so for a long time I thought it was an American technique. Seeing me using it, Joe Porcaro told me "Oh you play the French timpani technique". I didn't do any marching, but I think it isn't a technique used in French marching bands. Then it's a technique that works great to play single strokes (frisés, pronounced like "cliché") on the set.
 
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