Technique priority

JJKK

Member
I'm working on my left hand wrist currently. It needs to be more mobile so I can match the stick heights while doing fills and blast beats. I stretch before practice and work on bouncing the stick while doing a stone killer/blast beat endurance practice (Adding two bpm per session on blast beats).

I have to practice the free stroke "drop and catch" too. I'm basically a beginner at basic techniques. It's okay, I'm slowly progressing, but I get confused about what I'm actually supposed to be working on.

I think about playing metal music and start thinking that fingers are more important, THE priority in my playing. Maybe I'm overthinking things.
 

Arjun Diwaker

Active Member
its a great idea to start working on wrists. You definitely are overstepping the boundaries of thinking haha. The bouncing the stick part is good for endurance exercises since it will teach you to play in a more relaxed manner. I think by free stroke u mean the pushpull? Well my advice is focus on a particular thing for now. There is no need for other techniques when you can try and master one. In your case since you already have got the hang of the wrist motion it would be better to try and utilize that. Also next time try not using rebound at all and practice on a pillow or bar stool. If you do feel like adding fingers , you can focus on that later and then u can add fingers with wrist motion which increases the chance of extra power and a better motion. Good Luck!!
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I think about playing metal music and start thinking that fingers are more important, THE priority in my playing. Maybe I'm overthinking things.
Do you use a practice pad? You can sit on the couch and watch tv while bouncing the stick in your hand. Lots of us here do this as a viable way to mindlessly work on technique/speed/endurance/stickings without having to really think about it. If you have a pad, you can practice whenever and wherever you want.
 

JJKK

Member
Do you use a practice pad? You can sit on the couch and watch tv while bouncing the stick in your hand. Lots of us here do this as a viable way to mindlessly work on technique/speed/endurance/stickings without having to really think about it. If you have a pad, you can practice whenever and wherever you want.
I haven't bought a pad yet. I looked at a silent pad for apartment building practice.
 

JJKK

Member
Fingers are crucial. I’d encourage you to consider developing your finger engagement and control above everything else for now. Consider a few videos by Rick Dior on this topic, available on YouTube. His mastery is absolute, and he explains it very well.

I'll check out the videos.
 

Spreggy

Silver Member
You could check out Bill Bachmann's https://www.drumworkout.com/, excellent for developing finger control and all around hands technique. I started his program based on a heavy duty recommendation here and am loving it.
 

JJKK

Member
You could check out Bill Bachmann's https://www.drumworkout.com/, excellent for developing finger control and all around hands technique. I started his program based on a heavy duty recommendation here and am loving it.

I joined a drum school online just this week. I'll check this out later. Thanks for the suggestion!
 

davezedlee

Senior Member
work on proper shuffling with each hand, which will give you some dexterity and finer motor control, even tho' they're never used in metal
 

Hypercaffium

Active Member
My suggestion is to practice both single strokes and push-pull technique with both hands. I also suggest to get a practice pad with no rebound like the Moongel. Your wrists and fingers will fly after a while.
 

JJKK

Member
My suggestion is to practice both single strokes and push-pull technique with both hands. I also suggest to get a practice pad with no rebound like the Moongel. Your wrists and fingers will fly after a while.

I'm using a less bouncy surface now for practice. I do german grip stuff and finger practice on it.
 

Bozozoid

Platinum Member
Once again....as if I expected different from this forum a concern is posted.... and to the rescue comes advice that just...well?..is amazing to me. Talk about a helping hand..I'm using this advice myself!. This forum is SO much more than wing nuts and tension rods. I see answers from names I don't recognize and from those i do which tells me that no matter the question or time of day any drummer from any corner of the 🌎 can get a helping hand which to me is F'ing priceless.
 

BGDurham

Well-known Member
I watched these two hand technique videos recently and thought they were both quite informative:


 

Drumdame

Silver Member
Do you use a practice pad? You can sit on the couch and watch tv while bouncing the stick in your hand. Lots of us here do this as a viable way to mindlessly work on technique/speed/endurance/stickings without having to really think about it. If you have a pad, you can practice whenever and wherever you want.
What drum pad would you recommend? because I recently was at Guitar Center and they have so many to choose from... they all felt different. Is there one better than the other?

Drummer_D
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
What drum pad would you recommend? because I recently was at Guitar Center and they have so many to choose from... they all felt different. Is there one better than the other?

Drummer_D
I like the 12" Evans ReelFeel. It has a very bouncy side and a not bouncy side. The bouncy side is great for rebound. The not bouncy side is great for slow, controlled movements. I just set it on my knees. As long as I can sit down, I can always use it.

Pads are kind of personal. Put sticks on some and see if you like how they feel. As long as it feels good and you use it, that's the correct pad.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry" - Administrator
Staff member
FWIW, the technique I was taught....

It's a one handed clap....while holding the stick. You work your wrists and fingers but mainly your fingers. My teacher taught that the opening of the hand was the technique goal, and that was the main motion. (One handed clap) No elbows and really no arm movements except to move around the kit. I'm assuming matched grip.

There's many paths to the waterfall, this is just one that may or may not work for you.
 

Bozozoid

Platinum Member
FWIW, the technique I was taught....

It's a one handed clap....while holding the stick. You work your wrists and fingers but mainly your fingers. My teacher taught that the opening of the hand was the technique goal, and that was the main motion. (One handed clap) No elbows and really no arm movements except to move around the kit. I'm assuming matched grip.

There's many paths to the waterfall, this is just one that may or may not work for you.
In my minds eye I'm trying to grasp this. I think?? I have it. Interesting.
 
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