Single Stroke Chops - Good Book?

brentcn

Platinum Member
Thanks, but the idea was to get away from the standard rudiments (double strokes in particular), not learn rudimental solos or drum corps stuff.

I'm still working on rudiments, so the suggestions about rudimental stuff are great, but right now I'm thinking of a different project - learning to do a lot more with single strokes (and some super slow rudimental stuff).
It would really help if you posted an example of the type of playing you want to become able to do.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
1) First thing would be to stop working on other things, so you have time, focus and energy for your manin thing. Either work on that thing or do something else besides drumming.

2) Then you have to define what you want to be able to do. On a kit it becomes just as much about both movement and wrist conditining than somehow being able to play fast singles on a snare or regular pad. For wrist development away from the kit I highly recommend something like the Moongel pad. Just use it with proper technique and play cleanly no matter how slow than seems to you.

3) Sit down on the kit and do what you want to achieve. Add ideas to it that you like. Keep track of that and you'll quickly son see what needs work. Focus on that. I'll revert back to #1 and say that it's often good to work on one thing at a time. There are other ways to practice and moving between different things in context, but that's what you eventually add to those ideas. That's when it truly becomes useful and that takes time.

4) Is just an add to #2. Exercises are great and they also give you ideas, but there's always the danger of practicing something without thought and waiting for it to help something else. Practice exactly what you want to be able to do and leave the rest unless there's a problem you've become aware of that can be helped that way.

5) If you want some exercises there are tons of ways to practice grid or reading page exercises that are based on single strokes.
 

Genazvale

Junior Member
the idea was to get away from the standard rudiments (double strokes in particular), not learn rudimental solos or drum corps stuff.
I know what you mean, I had the same idea.
Buster Bailey Wrist Twisters have an entire chapter dedicated to single stroke development.
Also, check out Solfeggio Ritmique by Agostini - a lot of drills for singles. Great stuff! This one you can find in pdf.
 

TMe

Senior Member
Thanks for the suggestions. The Pantera stuff looks interesting. For reading and syncopation, Podemski's Standard Snare Drum Method might be my book.

What I didn't make clear is that I was thinking, of exercises for alternative (hybrid?) rudiments that use only single strokes. The herta is a good example. Maybe there aren't many others that aren't already included in the standard 40.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
Thanks for the suggestions. The Pantera stuff looks interesting. For reading and syncopation, Podemski's Standard Snare Drum Method might be my book.

What I didn't make clear is that I was thinking, of exercises for alternative (hybrid?) rudiments that use only single strokes. The herta is a good example. Maybe there aren't many others that aren't already included in the standard 40.
I do a variation of all of the counted rolls where I will play them as the normal double stroke roll, and then do them as a singled version.

In the marching/drum corps world we have the venerable Speed Rolls (or Hugga-Dugga -burr or Chicken and a roll) and I will do this in doubled and singled variations. This has developed my single stroke speed the shortest amount of time
 
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