New tricks?

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I can think of about 15-20 guys who are getting paid to do/use stuff like that...you just don't see them in mainstream music outlets...and there are probably many more as well...
Ok, what I MEANT was that it had almost no real-world application, and has its main value in the practice room. Who wants to listen to that for 2 hours? Lol
 
Cool, but you don’t get paid for that. Nice work with the kick drum, though. Really fast, consistent foot.
Maybe not that in itself , but the limb independence it translates to all around the kit can . I’m working on similar stuff now to get back that limb independence from years off the kit .
 
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MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I dig this stuff. Pushing the envelope of the instrument really gets me going. I find this much more exciting than the "normal" usage of a drum set.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
Maybe not that in itself , but the limb independence it translates to all around the kit can . I’m working on similar stuff now to get back that limb independence from years of the kit .
I think beats like the variations on the King Kong Beat and other such are more musically useful. But I agree, limb independence, when used in a more musical sense, can help you play stuff that’s a lot of fun to play AND listen to.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
I thought he was doing alternating the quadruplets on kick then hats but he has s a double and alternating between kick pedal and hats isn't he? I really like that clean articulate sound people get with their double kick. I do feet exercises like this between hats and single kick-doubles, triplets, quadruplets sort a like this, and I work on ride independence but this is cool. Once you got it going you could start changing your feet and hand pattern-make it a solo thing.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I thought he was doing alternating the quadruplets on kick then hats but he has s a double and alternating between kick pedal and hats isn't he? I really like that clean articulate sound people get with their double kick. I do feet exercises like this between hats and single kick-doubles, triplets, quadruplets sort a like this, and I work on ride independence but this is cool. Once you got it going you could start changing your feet and hand pattern-make it a solo thing.
Yes, double pedal, left foot operating both kick and hat pedals. He is playing 4 notes with the feet. The hands on the other, um...hand, are crazy. Snare is playing 5s, ride is doing 3s.

I think my wife just challenged me to try and learn this. If I do, I'm challenging her to some roast beef, mashed potatoes, and broccoli!
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
Ok, what I MEANT was that it had almost no real-world application, and has its main value in the practice room. Who wants to listen to that for 2 hours? Lol
got it...and I wasn't trying to be snarky, I was just saying that there are many places where people are looking for that kind of player, and they also can pay...

I personally would rather listen to 2 hours of that then 2 hours of "boom-chick, boom-chick", but I don't think that one is better than the other. They are both relevant in their own way....
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I personally would rather listen to 2 hours of that then 2 hours of "boom-chick, boom-chick",
A money beat that can make you dance is way more of a useful skill than some polyrhythmic across-the-bar-line stuff that only drummers care about. 99% of the population, including probably 1/2 of all drummers, would probably NOT enjoy listening to this guy play his beat for as long as they would enjoy the money beat played with some deep groove.

But it’s a great thing to play with in the practice room. Just don’t ever forget that a deep-groove money beat is 10x more important to master.
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
Not me, I gave it 20 seconds.

I appreciate technical ability, I just don't enjoy listening to it if it's not also musical. His 'playing' is astonishing, but it's not engaging.

Bermuda
I don't think it's meant to be a song lol. The point of playing it for as long as he did is probably to give the listener time to internalize it rather than just a 2 second flash.
I would have been blown away to hear that for one bar in the right context. A Fleetwood Mac song, no. But jazz fusion or prog metal, you bet!
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I don't think it's meant to be a song lol. The point of playing it for as long as he did is probably to give the listener time to internalize it rather than just a 2 second flash.
I would have been blown away to hear that for one bar in the right context. A Fleetwood Mac song, no. But jazz fusion or prog metal, you bet!
yeah...definitely in the right context...maybe for a "verse" or "chorus" depending on the vibe of the song. But DEFINITELY not somewhere it doesn't belong...

A money beat that can make you dance is way more of a useful skill than some polyrhythmic across-the-bar-line stuff that only drummers care about. 99% of the population, including probably 1/2 of all drummers, would probably NOT enjoy listening to this guy play his beat for as long as they would enjoy the money beat played with some deep groove.

But it’s a great thing to play with in the practice room. Just don’t ever forget that a deep-groove money beat is 10x more important to master.
yeah, I am not going against what you are saying...but am also just saying that his could be a "money beat" for many, and that is not wrong either. Deep grooves are just one kind of beat...
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I don't think there's a double pedal involved -- right foot only using the Jojo Mayer thing, getting a note out of the heel upstroke. The metal guys use it too.

It’s tough to see because of the camera angle, but I think you are right. That’s the thing that really impressed me, that fast, precise right foot work. The polyrhythmic stuff isn’t that hard, unless you don’t have any experience with that area.
 
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