New set for summer. Acrylic or Wood????

Joey182

Silver Member
As some of you may know, I finally got a job for summer that will pay very well for 15 years old. I have been speaking with the owner of Precision Drum Co. for the past 2 years, and I have always wanted to buy a kit from him, but never had the money.
So anyway... I have always loved the look and sound (recorded) of acrylics, but have never played one. My other option is to go wood, I have always played a wood kit, and love them.
So what do you think I should go for? The acrylic that I want is 2,800$ US, and the wood is 2,000$ US. Both are made from Precision Drums.
I play the Pop-Punk style such as Blink-182, Angels and Airwaves, +44, No Doubt, and others of that genre. I wonder how it will fit with my style?
***By The Way. The snare for the acrylic would be a maple 10 ply, with a 2 inch vent.
What do you think? -----Joey Lee
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
I think you're killing me Joey and I also think you've really got to start making a few decisions for yourself. You are so easily lead by the opinions of others that you chop and change your mind like others change their underwear. How many threads on "Which drums should I buy" have we had now? There's got to be a dozen I'd wager and they always start with you throwing a kit out there, someone else offering a different opinion, so then you change your mind and are interested in that one, then someone else wades in with a third option, which again sparks your interest and on and on it goes......unfortunately, the only thing we never get out of this exercise is the ability for you to make your mind up and settle on something.

So, tell me......have YOU played either of these kits and what did YOU think of them? Did one stand out more than the other? But most importantly, will you actually listen to peoples opinions this time and take advice that is offered by people who have a lot of experience or are we all wasting our time? If it's the former, then let YOUR ear guide you, take your time and be sure that the kit is the one that will make you happy........if it's the latter, then stop these threads as it doesn't matter what we say, you won't listen........ or just get the Acrylic as I secretly think that's what you want to hear. :)
 

Joey182

Silver Member
I think you're killing me Joey and I also think you've really got to start making a few decisions for yourself. You are so easily lead by the opinions of others that you chop and change your mind like others change their underwear. How many threads on "Which drums should I buy" have we had now? There's got to be a dozen I'd wager and they always start with you throwing a kit out there, someone else offering a different opinion, so then you change your mind and are interested in that one, then someone else wades in with a third option, which again sparks your interest and on and on it goes......unfortunately, the only thing we never get out of this exercise is the ability for you to make you mind up and settle on something.

So, tell me......have YOU played either of these kits and what did YOU think of them? Did one stand out more than the other? But most importantly, will you actually listen to peoples opinions this time and take advice that is offered by people who have a lot of experience or are we all wasting our time? If it's the former, then let YOUR ear guide you, take your time and be sure that the kit is the one that will make you happy........if it's the latter, then stop these threads as it doesn't matter what we say, you won't listen........ or just get the Acrylic as I secretly think that's what you want to hear. :)

HAHA! I will take all advice!
I heard that acrylics make Mics clip, or skip, or click. (Not sure what its called". But I heard that the drums are so loud that sometimes they sound like crap through mics that don't have an extreme noise tolerance level.
I do want the acrylic, and I actually have anted it for a while (2 years). I just now finally got a job to pay for it!
So what do you advise? I want to start recording, but don't want my Mics to "click" on the drums.
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
So what do you advise?

I've already advised you.....about a thousand times now remember? Keep the kit you have until you have at least half a clue as to what it is you want to get. Your referance to all these different kits tells me that you still haven't put much thought into it. If you had, you'd have been able to narrow your choices down to 3 or 4 kits....not the 30 or 40 you've flippantly mentioned across all your threads. You're way to eager to spend money for the sake of it mate....I do hope it's yours and not your parents.

That said, personally I would choose a wood kit....especially for recording. Not that I think that Acrylic won't record well, I've never used one, so wouldn't know....but remember, Bonham always used a maple kit in the studio, the Vistalite was only ever used live.....that tells me something. Plus, I'm just more partial to a wood kit than an acrylic one is all.


HAHA! I will take all advice!

No, you won't. :)
 

Nodiggie

Gold Member
I'm confused about the mic clipping issue associated with acrylic drums. I think most any audible noise can cause clipping. I would suggest finding the Odery dealer in FL and have a listen to them before you make your final decision.
 

Joey182

Silver Member
I've already advised you.....about a thousand times now remember? Keep the kit you have until you have at least half a clue as to what it is you want to get. Your referance to all these different kits tells me that you still haven't put much thought into it. If you had, you'd have been able to narrow your choices down to 3 or 4 kits....not the 30 or 40 you've flippantly mentioned across all your threads. You're way to eager to spend money for the sake of it mate....I do hope it's yours and not your parents.

That said, personally I would choose a wood kit....especially for recording. Not that I think that Acrylic won't record well, I've never used one, so wouldn't know....but remember, Bonham always used a maple kit in the studio, the Vistalite was only ever used live.....that tells me something. Plus, I'm just more partial to a wood kit than an acrylic one is all.




No, you won't. :)

Haha! I will take advice!
The money is min that I'm earning at a job I got. I want to get this kit from Gary (owner of Precision), because he is truly a skilled craftsman, nice guy, best customer service I've ever had, and The drums are gorgeous!
I want to go acrylic for when I play out! Which is occurring more often ;).
I have heard my friends sound sample of his Zickos acrylic, and the Mics were clipping the whole time. The drums sounded bad recorded, but AMAZING in person, but other times I see videos of acrylics on YouTube, with the perfect sound I want.
 

daredrummer

Gold Member
Dude just make a decision on your own...

When I was getting new heads, I looked around a bit to see what people recommended. Everyone recommended emps or amps. I rejected all of those recommendations, went with PS4's, and i couldn't be happier.

Find what you like. There's 300 billion people in the world. Do you really think that all 300 billion have the same preferences? What you like will be different from what I like. And different from the other 299,999,999,998 people.
 

Joey182

Silver Member
Dude just make a decision on your own...

When I was getting new heads, I looked around a bit to see what people recommended. Everyone recommended emps or amps. I rejected all of those recommendations, went with PS4's, and i couldn't be happier.

Find what you like. There's 300 billion people in the world. Do you really think that all 300 billion have the same preferences? What you like will be different from what I like. And different from the other 299,999,999,998 people.

Mainly I was referring to whether or not the drums will sound like crap through the mics.
Also to see if the acrylic is a waste of money to something I might not like.
Those questions were hidden somewhere in there ;)
 

daredrummer

Gold Member
Mainly I was referring to whether or not the drums will sound like crap through the mics.
Also to see if the acrylic is a waste of money to something I might not like.
Those questions were hidden somewhere in there ;)
Well if that's the case then i suggest reading over your post again.
As some of you may know, I finally got a job for summer that will pay very well for 15 years old. I have been speaking with the owner of Precision Drum Co. for the past 2 years, and I have always wanted to buy a kit from him, but never had the money.
So anyway... I have always loved the look and sound (recorded) of acrylics, but have never played one. My other option is to go wood, I have always played a wood kit, and love them.
So what do you think I should go for? The acrylic that I want is 2,800$ US, and the wood is 2,000$ US. Both are made from Precision Drums.
I play the Pop-Punk style such as Blink-182, Angels and Airwaves, +44, No Doubt, and others of that genre. I wonder how it will fit with my style?
***By The Way. The snare for the acrylic would be a maple 10 ply, with a 2 inch vent.
What do you think? -----Joey Lee
The word "mic" is not once used.
 

daredrummer

Gold Member
Read my second post.
The whole thing is basically me trying to figure out a kit that I will love, but will also be versatile.

Who are we to determine what kit you will love? I have no idea what kit you will love, nor do any other membera on this forum.

But wait.... There's ONE person on this forum that could find out exactly what you love... Can you guess who it is?
 

Joey182

Silver Member
Who are we to determine what kit you will love? I have no idea what kit you will love, nor do any other membera on this forum.

But wait.... There's ONE person on this forum that could find out exactly what you love... Can you guess who it is?

Please don't say ME!
I live in Florida, and music stores by me have to special order acrylics. So I can't just go play one. It will take time to finally play one.
 

caddywumpus

Archnemesis of Larryace
The "clipping mic" problem would have to be the engineer's fault. Either the mics used couldn't handle the SPLs (as I think you're implgying...if so, then there are other mics that can do the job just fine), the positioning of the mics was absurd, the gain or preamps were turned up too much, or there was some EQing/processing/effect used that made a clicking sound in the final recording. Do you really believe that acrylic sets are unrecordable because they're so loud? Of course not--it's engineer error!

As for which kit to buy: neither. You've already got a decent kit, and you don't know what you're looking for. Put away the money you earn this summer for college.
 

Joey182

Silver Member
The "clipping mic" problem would have to be the engineer's fault. Either the mics used couldn't handle the SPLs (as I think you're implgying...if so, then there are other mics that can do the job just fine), the positioning of the mics was absurd, the gain or preamps were turned up too much, or there was some EQing/processing/effect used that made a clicking sound in the final recording. Do you really believe that acrylic sets are unrecordable because they're so loud? Of course not--it's engineer error!

As for which kit to buy: neither. You've already got a decent kit, and you don't know what you're looking for. Put away the money you earn this summer for college.

You just scared the crap out of me with the college remark.
Do you realize that I'm not going to be able to play my drums there?!?! I can't go home any play on weekends either!?!?! I better get an E-kit!
I really do want to get an acrylic though, and your right. It probably was the engineers fault.
Seriously! Why would a company make an unrecordable set?
Did you see the kit I want to get though?
The sizes are
22x20-acrylic (Blue)
12x9-acrylic (Blue)
14x15-acrylic (Blue)
13x7-Maple 10 ply with silver sparkle and a 2 inch vent.
http://precisiondrum.com/Lou_acrylic.GIF
 

Ian

Silver Member
First: acrylic drums will not make mics clip, poor recording techniques will.

Second: I find it completely flabbergasting that while you keep asking for the opinions, experience, and advice of the members of this forum you continue to COMPLETELY IGNORE the most common piece of advice that has been offered; that is to play what you have until you can make your own decision.

You say you want a deep bass drum because you like a deep, boomy sound, but I wonder if you have ever played one. Pitch and sustain do not increase with depth.

You say you want two chrome O-Rings in the reso head. Why? That will contribute to killing your boom.

You say you want a ported snare drum, but have you played one? Oftentimes ported snares lack sensitivity. Instead of paying out the nose for a custom snare why don't you take your current snare and a 2" hole saw and port a drum you already own? It will confirm whether or not YOU want that sound.

I hate pulling out the "When I was your age card," but at 15 I primarily played guitar and I was SURE I wanted a super-strat with H-S-H pickup config, a 16" fretboard radius, and a Floyd Rose trem. Suffice to say that particular guitar is about the last instrument I'd buy now. I also don't want digital processors, DW kits, Paiste cymbals, or Ken Smith basses like I did when I was 15.

If you buy a custom kit it won't have the resale value you will want when you go to get a new kit. Your tastes in music and drums WILL change. You WILL want a new kit eventually. Do as much research as will make you comfortable in your purchase. Everyone will have opinions and we've already shared some of them.

This is not an attack, but your questions are so broad it tells all of us who have been around for a while that you have very little experience and knowledge of what makes a drum sound a certain way. How many plys will you choose? Why? How will the bearing edges be cut? Why? Do you want Pearl-style or gullwing-style spurs? Why do you want die-cast hoops?

If you insist on going custom, take a careful look at every option you have and make sure your selections will help you achieve your goals.

Old Fart over and out! - actually, I'm not even 30.
 

Joey182

Silver Member
First: acrylic drums will not make mics clip, poor recording techniques will.

Second: I find it completely flabbergasting that while you keep asking for the opinions, experience, and advice of the members of this forum you continue to COMPLETELY IGNORE the most common piece of advice that has been offered; that is to play what you have until you can make your own decision.

You say you want a deep bass drum because you like a deep, boomy sound, but I wonder if you have ever played one. Pitch and sustain do not increase with depth.

You say you want two chrome O-Rings in the reso head. Why? That will contribute to killing your boom.

You say you want a ported snare drum, but have you played one? Oftentimes ported snares lack sensitivity. Instead of paying out the nose for a custom snare why don't you take your current snare and a 2" hole saw and port a drum you already own? It will confirm whether or not YOU want that sound.

I hate pulling out the "When I was your age card," but at 15 I primarily played guitar and I was SURE I wanted a super-strat with H-S-H pickup config, a 16" fretboard radius, and a Floyd Rose trem. Suffice to say that particular guitar is about the last instrument I'd buy now. I also don't want digital processors, DW kits, Paiste cymbals, or Ken Smith basses like I did when I was 15.

If you buy a custom kit it won't have the resale value you will want when you go to get a new kit. Your tastes in music and drums WILL change. You WILL want a new kit eventually. Do as much research as will make you comfortable in your purchase. Everyone will have opinions and we've already shared some of them.

This is not an attack, but your questions are so broad it tells all of us who have been around for a while that you have very little experience and knowledge of what makes a drum sound a certain way. How many plys will you choose? Why? How will the bearing edges be cut? Why? Do you want Pearl-style or gullwing-style spurs? Why do you want die-cast hoops?

If you insist on going custom, take a careful look at every option you have and make sure your selections will help you achieve your goals.

Old Fart over and out! - actually, I'm not even 30.

I have had MANY vented snares before. I love the sound and how dry they are.
All shells will be 1/4 thick with triple-flange hoops. I want Pearl-style spurs, 45 degree edges. 30 degree isn't the sound I've loved. All lugs for the kit are "Teardrop" lugs.
The Bass Drum O's make my bass more punchy and less boomy I will agree. But When I did it to my bass drum I loved the sound, I just wanted it longer. I have played from an 18x20 up to a 24x22. The 24x22 sounded terrible IMO.
The bass hoop (Reso) will be 3 inches (looks cool to me) Wrapped in chrome on the inside and out. The bass hoop (batter) will be 2 inches wrapped the same way.
The snare is 10 ply 13x7 with a 2 inch vent. full length tube lugs, Dunnet T/O.
I haven't owned all these sizes, but my friend works at Guitar Center, and will hand me a drum key when I walk in to see what catches my ear, or in this case my ear.

Any more questions? *****That sounded cocky, I didn't mean for it to sound that way.
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
Good heavens.

When I was your age, Joey, I worked my butt off to get a probably third-or-fourth-hand drumset from someone's basement. It had a 12" cymbal, 12" hi-hats that inverted if I stepped on the pedal too hard, the floor tom was the snare with the bottom head and snares off it, the snare drum was thrashed, the heads were 1960s vintage, the kick pedal looked like the first one ever made. It cost $225 and that's because we talked the owner down. (Looking back now I think that I made a great deal because the snare was a 1962 Blue Duco Ludwig pioneer that after restoration got me $600. But I digress.)

Fast forward three years. Again, after working my butt off (I landscaped and cleared ten acres of scrub brush for my old man in one summer), I got a new set for Christmas - a five-piece Taiwan special with a 6-lug kick drum and no cymbal stands. And I played the hell out of that set for eight years until I bought my own set, which I personally picked out after going to a drum store and trying out everything in my price range.

Forgive me, but every time I read about you going on about maybe I should go buy this two-grand-plus drum set, no, I like this one, no, I think this one looks cooler, and you've obviously set your star on this one style of music and this one particular drummer who shall not be name on this forum lest we start a flaming war - - it makes me die a little inside.

We've been where you are, where flashy looks and cool ad campaigns with your favorite drummers catch your attention. And we want those kits - oh how we want them! I wanted Charlie Benante's huge Tama setup on the rack, circa 1993! When Neil Peart added Simmons pads onto the back of his set, do you know how I wanted a set of Simmons drums? Never mind that the nearest place I might buy them was 300 miles away? Alex Van Halen had seethrough drums back in the day, too, and man I thought that was the coolest look.

But when we try and share our experience with you, it's like throwing the frisbee to a statue... it's just bouncing off your forehead. You immediately come back and reply to each poster, saying you get what we're saying.... but you're not.

I don't want you to post immediately after my reply, answering some detail of what I'm saying to you. I want you to sleep on it. (That is, if you do sleep.)

Learn to love the intricacies of your instrument. The one you have right now. I play a Yamaha Stage Custom, man. Not the new birch version which I understand sounds great right out of the box. I'm talking falkata and Philippine mahogany, man, mid-90s technology at its best.... pure middle of the road, intermediate goods. I worked for a long time tweaking these drums to sound good enough to take into a studio and have the engineer ask me if they were Recording Customs. I learned to wring every bit of performance out of a set that cost maybe a third of the one you're posting about. I have played recording sessions, metal, rock, Latin, musicals, doo-wop, theater, church hymns, alternative, coffeehouse, amphitheater, nightclub, stage, and bar with these things. I have a great income. I toyed with the idea of picking up a set of DWs or a Yamaha MCA as a retirement present to myself. But you know what? I fell in love with these drums, because I know them so well and we've done so much together. And who cares if they're "intermediate"? The way I tune them, they fool studio engineers. People constantly come up to me and tell me how much they love my sound... other drummers, man. And oh yeah, the snare I'm running right now is a secondhand Supraphonic copy with an inverted bead I picked up in a warehouse sale for $75 twenty years ago this week. No vents, no mods, no crazy gimmicks. It's me bleeding and sweating over that Ambassador to get it sounding like a million bucks. I've had to replace almost all the cheap Chinese lugs on that thing, the shell's even slightly out of round, makes tuning it a pain in the butt. But when I get it dialed in, it sounds like Thor cracking his hammer across your eardrums.

Am I getting through to you? Because I think between me, PFOG, Caddy, Ian, and the rest of the forum, we just want you to get off the dang "what should I buy next" kick and sit down and PLAY. I wish that the next time I come to this forum and see your name starting a thread, you've posted a sound clip or a YouTube link where you (and maybe some of your friends who play guitar and bass or whatever) put together something and we get to hear your style, your phrasing, your sense of timing. Then I feel like I'll have something worthwhile to say to you about what direction you can take to improve. Because the gear... the gear is just the medium. And whether you go get that flashy acrylic set with the wide front hoop and the front tom set down so low or not, it will NEVER get you the gig or make you play better. Only the gear between your ears will do that. And so long as that's the only thing you ask on this forum, that's no improvement at all.

If this sounds harsh, sure, I can live with that. My bandleader just called me in the middle of having supper with my family, and I ended up playing a coffeehouse gig with a snare, bass, and ride cymbal only. Unrehearsed. And everyone in that coffeehouse got up and danced. I did not need a wide bass drum hoop or vents in my snare. I just needed me to be there and play what needed to be played. Bam.

Play. Play whatever, but please just play. And let that be the end of it, already!!
 
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