Meinl cymbal tuners

Cmdr. Ross

Silver Member
Anyone ever use these? If so what did you think of them?
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Iristone

Regular Poster
I've a kit, but honestly I don't really use them on cymbals. Personally I'd only dampen a cymbal if it's made of a cheap stamped piece of sheet metal (like Zildjian ZBT's or Meinl's own Classic Customs). Could be quite handy on cowbells, though.
 

Cmdr. Ross

Silver Member
They're basically just strong magnets with Meinl branding. I pulled the trigger on a set as they're not very expensive. They're actually cheaper than an equal number of strong magnets from ACE Hardware.:unsure:
Place them out more to the edge & it shortens the attack & sustain of the cymbal. Closer to the bell & the volume will come down a bit. Unlike tape, you can move them around at will if you want to change the sound on the fly.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
They're basically just strong magnets with Meinl branding. I pulled the trigger on a set as they're not very expensive. They're actually cheaper than an equal number of strong magnets from ACE Hardware.:unsure:
Place them out more to the edge & it shortens the attack & sustain of the cymbal. Closer to the bell & the volume will come down a bit. Unlike tape, you can move them around at will if you want to change the sound on the fly.
I suppose it's the tin that makes magnets stick?

I didn't think magnets stuck to copper alloys

I'm surprised a magnet sticks to cymbals. I'll have to investigate this further. I never tried it.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Hmmmmmm. Copper + magnet + movement = electricity

Anyone else intrigued by this idea?
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I suppose it's the tin that makes magnets stick?

I didn't think magnets stuck to copper alloys

I'm surprised a magnet sticks to cymbals. I'll have to investigate this further. I never tried it.
You need one top and bottom. The magnets stick to each other through the cymbal.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
You need one top and bottom. The magnets stick to each other through the cymbal.
Yea I knew that. I was just testing to see who else knew that :p

I can't believe I didn't even consider that. No further investigation needed now.
Hmmmmmm. Copper + magnet + movement = electricity

Anyone else intrigued by this idea?
So I can power my cell phone by putting magnets on my cymbal (one top and one bottom), hitting the cymbal, and let the subsequent cymbal /magnet movement generate micro voltages. I just have to figure out how to harness the the varying magnetic field and channel it into my cell phone.

Wait, I got it. A ferrous metal stationary grid suspended over the cymbal, wired to my cell phone voltage contacts. When I hit that cymbal, the movement allows magnetic lines of force to be "cut" by the ferrous metal grid, thereby generating a micro voltage in that grid. And my phone charges. Brilliant, I am :)

ART! (said like the chick in Austin Powers. SCOTT!)
 
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Quai34

Junior Member
I bought them, I had Already done on my my Meiñl Mark Johnson Cow bell and wanted to try them on cymbals. They work well but as of today I didn't find a permanent solution for them, even on cymbals that have a big "roar". I could put it on the Sabian Artisan light ride which is really loud but not now, maybe when I will record? But they work well and it's cheap so, go for it, that's a ni en accessory to have in your bag.
 
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Cmdr. Ross

Silver Member
even off cymbals that have a big "roar".
I use them for when I'm using my crash/ride as a ride. I sometimes need to calm the wash down a bit and these seem to do the trick.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I just have to figure out how to harness the the varying magnetic field and channel it into my cell phone
USB cord. This will show you how. Sorry for the annoying accompanying music.


I just did an experiment. I used 2 magnets to tame my rides. The magnets completely killed any ring either ride has. One ride is a 20" Sabian PRO, it only pings and rings forever. Dead. No ring at all.

Then I tried binder clips. They had a similar effect but still let some ring through. Different sized clips had different results. They were not nearly as abrupt as the magnets.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Re: Big roar...

In some, not all, cases the big roar you hear is a rack or floor tom head vibrating. If you hear the roar, damp your tom heads and see if it still makes a roar. That would be a useful bit of information if the cymbal roar went away with damping
 

TK-421

Senior Member
I use them for when I'm using my crash/ride as a ride. I sometimes need to calm the wash down a bit and these seem to do the trick.
I have a set, and that's exactly how I use mine. I have a 19" K Dark Light Crash that I also use as a left-side ride when playing jazz gigs, and I place the smaller magnets on the bow of the cymbal right by the bell. They do a nice job of controlling the "crash" overtones, making it sound more like a ride. It actually works really well for this, but I don't know of any other scenarios where the magnets would come in handy.
 

Cmdr. Ross

Silver Member
They do a nice job of controlling the "crash" overtones, making it sound more like a ride. It actually works really well for this, but I don't know of any other scenarios where the magnets would come in handy.
Agreed.
I've learned that crash/rides either make good crashes or good rides. Rarely both.
The 18" Zildjian I have is one half of crash cymbals used in a marching band. So it's thicker and makes a better ride cymbal. But the wash is unreal when you get it moving.
The tuners keep this in check.
 
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