Long-term cymbal storage

w3r1_drums

Senior Member
Hey all!

I've unfortunately not been able to play drums for over a year, which means my cymbals have needed a place to stay.

I've had them in a hardshell skb case stood upright and I'm beginning to wonder if this could possibly be damaging to the cymbals to be stacked like that forever.

I took them out today for the first time in months to look at them and there was a bit of a discoloration on the bottom of the bell of my 20" ride and the bell of my 16" crash looked like it could be cracking a bit on the underside.

I know I'm not nearly as knowledgeable on this as I should be and I tend to worry about things that don't matter in the long run, so I thought I'd ask here if anyone thinks I should be concerned about any of this. I attached pictures of stuff below

thanks!
 

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Al Strange

Well-known member
Hey all!

I've unfortunately not been able to play drums for over a year, which means my cymbals have needed a place to stay.

I've had them in a hardshell skb case stood upright and I'm beginning to wonder if this could possibly be damaging to the cymbals to be stacked like that forever.

I took them out today for the first time in months to look at them and there was a bit of a discoloration on the bottom of the bell of my 20" ride and the bell of my 16" crash looked like it could be cracking a bit on the underside.

I know I'm not nearly as knowledgeable on this as I should be and I tend to worry about things that don't matter in the long run, so I thought I'd ask here if anyone thinks I should be concerned about any of this. I attached pictures of stuff below

thanks!
Storing them in a hard case won’t damage them in of itself...👍🙂
 

Lee-Bro

Senior Member
If your hard shell case has a bolt through the center to align and hold the cymbals, I'd suggest putting a plastic or rubber sleeve around it to eliminate metal on metal contact at the mounting hole. I know key-holing is a result of metal rubbing metal from playing the cymbals, but I've never seen actual proof of key-holing happen as a result of storage/static position over the long term...yet, I'm paranoid and use plastic sleeves on my 1 case that has the center holder bolt.
 

someguy01

Well-known member
I store cymbals with felts between and then a piece of threaded rod inserted down through the mounting holes and secured with flat washers and two nuts jammed together. No movement, no metal to metal contact, no damage.
 

iCe

Senior Member
A smaller cymbal will 'hang' on the center thread and that could cause a keyhole over time, because a lot of the weight of the cymbal rests now on that part. Looks like that has happened.

The discoloration looks like patina or dirt that develops over time and should come off after a good rub.
 

JaysonJeanChannel

Well-known member
Hey all!

I've unfortunately not been able to play drums for over a year, which means my cymbals have needed a place to stay.

I've had them in a hardshell skb case stood upright and I'm beginning to wonder if this could possibly be damaging to the cymbals to be stacked like that forever.

I took them out today for the first time in months to look at them and there was a bit of a discoloration on the bottom of the bell of my 20" ride and the bell of my 16" crash looked like it could be cracking a bit on the underside.

I know I'm not nearly as knowledgeable on this as I should be and I tend to worry about things that don't matter in the long run, so I thought I'd ask here if anyone thinks I should be concerned about any of this. I attached pictures of stuff below

thanks!
I wished I had this when I had to store my cymbals in a storage unit for a couple of months 😪
 

Roscoe Joe

Active member
I've had cymbals stored in a hardcase for years without issue. But I've also had a new cymbal stored for a short time (not in same case) and got discoloration on the underside. My guess is that was due do the dividers used (though I could be wrong).
 

sumdrumguy

Senior Member
Hardshell cases are fine for cymbals as long as there is no moisture. It's easy enough to prevent by tossing in a couple of silica-bead packets that remain from your Amazon orders.
THIS! I store any cymbals/drums not in rotation - set up to play - in cases. Every case has at least one desicate pack.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
THIS! I store any cymbals/drums not in rotation - set up to play - in cases. Every case has at least one desicate pack.
One thing I would like to note for anyone thinking of using D-packs....

Wood likes 50% humidity and will equilibrate it's moisture content to ambient environment over time. If storing long-term, try not to go crazy with the D-packs. One or two is enough. If you use a few dozen D packs in a sealed enclosure, and store the drums for several years, you risk making the wood brittle and fall apart.

Also note that this is VERY important for acoustic lute instruments like guitars and violins, and is probably of lesser importance to drums.

I guess my point is. You're right, but people need not go crazy, as it will potentially damage their instrument.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I own 34 cymbals.

The ones that don't see constant use are in a hardshell case, with little felt pieces cut out to match their size in between them, and the piece of rubber hose over the center bolt of the case. They sit in the case from largest on the "bottom" to smallest. Then I lay the case flat so that it is sitting with the largest cymbal closest to the floor. I actually have 3 "holding" cases, and one traveling case.

I never thought about putting the little dry packs in because I always eat them....especially the ones that come in jerky. They are so good!!
 

someguy01

Well-known member
Wood likes 50% humidity and will equilibrate it's moisture content to ambient environment over time. If storing long-term, try not to go crazy with the D-packs.
I use humidor medium inside stored drums, it maintains the perfect amount of moisture.
 
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