It's always this config...

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
This particular kit of mine (a re-worked 1976 Rogers kit) has four toms and several cymbals to use. But every time I go out on a gig, I use this much. But dang, doesn't it look cool?

8x12, 16x16, 14x22 with 6.5" snare. Hi hats and a crash/ride. That's it. I could balance out the look by adding the extra floor tom, but it's really superfluous. It's all about the time with everybody I play with. I think the only thing I'm insisting on these days is a solid throne and a bass drum pedal with a plate since the last few gigs were on those make-shift stages that bounce if the bands get a little raucous. But I can pretty much make this config work for about 99% of what I do. Oh - and I do add a cowbell (the small classic Black Beauty one too). But I am seriously diggin' these thin shells with the maple reinforcement rings. They want to explode a lot quicker than my DW kit (thicker with no rings) does.
 

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Bozozoid

Well-known member
I could name so many guys that have changed the WORLD on that setup. Page after page of awe inspiring world class drummers taking the meek and humble 4 piece over the galaxy into territories unheard of by humanity throughout the history of music and you know them as well as I do. When you look at that set up you are looking into the past and future of some of the greatest drummers who have ever graced a stage from 2 to 20.000 people.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
Why take more than you need.......ever! It's win/win:

* Sounds great
* Easy load in
* Easy load out
* Quick set up/tear down
* Less to lug back into the house when you get home

I own and love the 22/12/16 setup but I gig a 20/12/14 because I can fit that in 2 bags.
 

rhumbagirl

Senior Member
I got my 5-piece Tama Granstar Customs out for a gig last month, and the weight of the 22 kick was at least twice as much as the 18 kick from my Gretsch Catalina Club 4-piece, which is now my goto config because of weight and space for transport.

We pack the entire band in a Suburban, and have enough room for 3 band members and a significant other. I like the 4-piece because of the easy ride location. I didn't find out the Gretsch 18/12/14 could sound big until I low-tuned the toms on my last gig. My config for a blues rock band is the Gretsch kit plus a ride and four crashes.

Note: Part of the weightiness of the Tama kick is due to having it in a SKB case. It's a mint condition Tama kit, so the kick and floortom ride in cases, and the two toms in bags.
 
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Iristone

Well-known member
Why take more than you need.......ever! It's win/win:

* Sounds great
* Easy load in
* Easy load out
* Quick set up/tear down
* Less to lug back into the house when you get home

I own and love the 22/12/16 setup but I gig a 20/12/14 because I can fit that in 2 bags.
In a recording situation it also reduces sympathetic vibrations across the kit, without having to resort to excessive muffling or gating. I know some drummers (e.g. Keith Moon) who gig large kits (with the help from roadies), but record with a smaller part of it.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I love it. Black Rogers; you can't go wrong. Nice config too.

My kit has two floor toms, a 14" and a 15". I don't even use the 14" it currently has a glass top and I use it as an end table in my living room.
I also have a converted 12x15 on legs I can add to the kit. It balances out the look but it isn’t really musically necessary.
 

Jeff Almeyda

Senior Consultant
That setup is timeless and your kit looks totally classy and cool.
I agree with you, a four piece set is all I use unless playing prog or metal.
 

incrementalg

Gold Member
My favorite config these days. I have a 7 piece set and I keep taking it apart and going back to 4 or maybe 5 w one up two down. I like it simple these days. Bo, love the look of those drums…super classy.
 

Jeff Almeyda

Senior Consultant
You mean no one can accuse you of making all your gigs prog (like just about every drummer has done?) 😂😂😂
It's extremey difficult to get people to dance in 15/8 time lol
 

Darth Vater

Senior Member
You'll forgive me for chuckling at the fact that you guys brag about taking only what you need to a gig but you don't mind paying for drums that you don't even use. 🤷‍♂️
 

Duct Tape

Member
Please forgive a newbie question, but number of “pieces” continues to confuse me, particulary if the snare is counted or not. I think all posts in this thread consistently include the snare in the count but elsewhere I’ve seen it to be different.

An example is this “5 piece” kit on Sweetwater. I’ll post the link but mods please remove it if not ok.

Thx for any clarification. Jon
 

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
Please forgive a newbie question, but number of “pieces” continues to confuse me, particulary if the snare is counted or not. I think all posts in this thread consistently include the snare in the count but elsewhere I’ve seen it to be different.

An example is this “5 piece” kit on Sweetwater. I’ll post the link but mods please remove it if not ok.

Thx for any clarification. Jon
The size of a kit will always include a snare. So a 5 piece would generally be 3 toms, a snare, and a kick.

Unless it's a "shell pack"...which can sometimes cause confusion. A shell pack is a kit (with all the toms, and kick drum)...but without the snare. (like the one you linked from Sweetwater)
 
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Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Please forgive a newbie question, but number of “pieces” continues to confuse me, particulary if the snare is counted or not. I think all posts in this thread consistently include the snare in the count but elsewhere I’ve seen it to be different.

An example is this “5 piece” kit on Sweetwater. I’ll post the link but mods please remove it if not ok.

Thx for any clarification. Jon
Understandable. Yes. You count the snare. So the term, "4-piece" usually means snare, bass drum, rack tom, and a floor tom. I've seen some guys go "3-piece", by eliminating the one rack tom - which stretches your creativity even more because you have less voices to use. But in my case, 90% of the night is played on bass drum, snare drum, and hi-hat, so having two toms and a couple of cymbals is almost too much. And then there are those times I bring out four toms (creating a 6-piece kit) because I want to play bigger tom fills or feel more voices will help in a certain situation. BUT - in my current cover band situation, musically I can do any gig with four drums. If I do a tribute band project, I try to get close to what the original guy played since you are, after all, mimicking a well-known act and the visual is just as important as the musical.

I once met a guy who said he played in a Rush tribute band with a 4-piece DW kit. Musically he was getting close, but I think the audience felt a little gipped not seeing enough drums up on stage.
 

Jeremy Bender

Platinum Member
Classy kit! Rogers made terrific sounding drums.

I agree about 4pc. sets. Andy Newmark & Steve Ferrone have done more on that config. than I could hope to accomplish in a lifetime.
 
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