In Thru the Out Door Docu..(Led Zep

jda

Silver Member
quite amazing piece of work from You tuber JCM
7 Parts
1-7
very enjoyable all the way, all 7 parts, to the end.
well except for the sad ending :
but very moving

Check it out. all 7 episodes on You Tube.
this is (only) episode 1. (watch em all.

 
Last edited:

Huw Owens

Active Member
Funny story...

I'm a member of several Zep forums. Years ago I bought my wife a coffee table book about Abba, and inside it, in the chapter on the opening of Polar Studios, was a photo of the cover of the brochure advertising the new studio. The picture on the cover depicted one of the studio live rooms, and prominently showed two drumkits - one green, one silver or chrome, in "Bonham configuration" .

The text checked out: it mentioned the dates of the photo session, and the recording dates of the first band (apart from Abba) to use the studio - Led Zeppelin. They were close enough that it seemed reasonable to assume these were indeed Bonham's kits on the cover of the Polar Studios brochure.

Feeling quite pleased with myself I posted a scan of the photo, plus my detective work, on a couple of Zep forums. Photos of the recording sessions were very, very, rare so it got a very good reception.

Until...

The webmaster at the official forum posted in my thread to say that he had shown my photo to Jason Bonham, who had stated that these were definitely not his dad's drums. Well, I wasn't convinced , and I still use the Polar Studios brochure as my avatar on the Zep forums, but that effectively killed the excitement about my "find".

Until...

When the remastered expanded CD of In Through The Out Door was released it came with a booklet containing, amongst other things, studio photos from the sessions. Can you guess what's coming?

Yep - there for all to see were Bonham's drums. The same drums, in the same room, that were on the brochure cover I had found. I was right all along.

You can see at least one of these photos in this video series.

My tiny little contribution, lol!

:)
 
One of my clearest memories of 1979 is my then-girlfriend (Cathy) brought the new Zeppelin over to my house. At age 15, we were excited to be listening to the first "current" Zep album of memory, and we couldn't wait to hear the band's latest iteration of its bombastic stomp and lyrics about druids and elves that our bong-wasted brains thirsted for.

In the Evening had the eerie tone we loved, and the profound thud of earlier LZ songs, but then turned into something almost danceable that we didn't quite understand.

On South Bound Saurez, our minds were reeling ... "Boogie-woogie piano from Zeppelin? Oof ... No thanks."

"Fool in the Rain" sounded perfectly packaged for FM radio and was probably our favorite, but then:

Hot Dog -- "What's this "Hee-Haw (expletive). This is awful. Are we missing some kind of joke here?"

I won't go through all 7 tracks, but that's still my reaction to the album as a whole. When I'm in the mood for Led Zeppelin, "IttOD" is never what I reach for.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
Still have my copy in the original brown paper bag.

Re: Polar Studios, I always thought they got the best drum sound on any Zep record on Presence.

In Through The Outdoor is a bit of a marmite album you either love or hate it. You can tell Page & Plant weren't getting on by the amount of John Paul Jones on it. Carouselambra is my pick of the bunch.
 

Stroman

Platinum Member
One of my clearest memories of 1979 is my then-girlfriend (Cathy) brought the new Zeppelin over to my house. At age 15, we were excited to be listening to the first "current" Zep album of memory, and we couldn't wait to hear the band's latest iteration of its bombastic stomp and lyrics about druids and elves that our bong-wasted brains thirsted for.

In the Evening had the eerie tone we loved, and the profound thud of earlier LZ songs, but then turned into something almost danceable that we didn't quite understand.

On South Bound Saurez, our minds were reeling ... "Boogie-woogie piano from Zeppelin? Oof ... No thanks."

"Fool in the Rain" sounded perfectly packaged for FM radio and was probably our favorite, but then:

Hot Dog -- "What's this "Hee-Haw (expletive). This is awful. Are we missing some kind of joke here?"

I won't go through all 7 tracks, but that's still my reaction to the album as a whole. When I'm in the mood for Led Zeppelin, "IttOD" is never what I reach for.
Very interesting! We are pretty close to the same age, but I had a totally different reaction. I thought that the unusual song choices were weird and wonderful. And the band I was playing in at the time immediately started playing (poorly, I'm sure) Carouselambra and In the Evening. All of My Love was our prom theme, lol.

And I thought Hot Dog was a great, fun joke.

As for the album cover, I no longer have the brown paper, sadly. Do you remember that, if you wet the cover, the B/W became color?
 

calan

Silver Member
quite amazing piece of work from You tuber JCM
7 Parts
1-7
very enjoyable all the way, all 7 parts, to the end.
well except for the sad ending :
but very moving

Check it out. all 7 episodes on You Tube.
this is (only) episode 1. (watch em all.

I think I got through part 4 last night.

I'm generally skeptical of YouTube videos, because, well, you have seen them. But this is actually good, long form content. A YouTube unicorn.

A few stray thoughts I had while watching (I think I got through part 4):

Does anybody actually buy the products in those ads?

Early on, there is a little bit of background, and some footage of the creator playing "Since I've Been Loving You." First off, he was absolutely playing the hell out of the solo. I thought to myself, this is promising, this guy isn't just a fan. I also got kind of jealous as I was watching the drummer, because I've always wanted to play that song live, just never been in the situation where the right combination of ability, interest, and context existed. Then the band got to the end of the chorus, and I kind of shuddered at the drummer's feel. I'm probably being hypercritical, but it threw me in the moment.

The narrator occasionally sounds like an AI to me.
 

jda

Silver Member
the narrator- reason she was needed is addressed at the beginning) yes she's real)
 

Juniper

Gold Member
Funny story...

I'm a member of several Zep forums. Years ago I bought my wife a coffee table book about Abba, and inside it, in the chapter on the opening of Polar Studios, was a photo of the cover of the brochure advertising the new studio. The picture on the cover depicted one of the studio live rooms, and prominently showed two drumkits - one green, one silver or chrome, in "Bonham configuration" .

The text checked out: it mentioned the dates of the photo session, and the recording dates of the first band (apart from Abba) to use the studio - Led Zeppelin. They were close enough that it seemed reasonable to assume these were indeed Bonham's kits on the cover of the Polar Studios brochure.

Feeling quite pleased with myself I posted a scan of the photo, plus my detective work, on a couple of Zep forums. Photos of the recording sessions were very, very, rare so it got a very good reception.

Until...

The webmaster at the official forum posted in my thread to say that he had shown my photo to Jason Bonham, who had stated that these were definitely not his dad's drums. Well, I wasn't convinced , and I still use the Polar Studios brochure as my avatar on the Zep forums, but that effectively killed the excitement about my "find".

Until...

When the remastered expanded CD of In Through The Out Door was released it came with a booklet containing, amongst other things, studio photos from the sessions. Can you guess what's coming?

Yep - there for all to see were Bonham's drums. The same drums, in the same room, that were on the brochure cover I had found. I was right all along.

You can see at least one of these photos in this video series.

My tiny little contribution, lol!

:)
Nice Job!

Is this the photo? It appears that his stainless steel kit may have made an appearance on the album, which is cool to find out.

EF08CDBA-47F1-4A65-BF95-7C8B3E746310.jpeg
 
Still have my copy in the original brown paper bag.

Re: Polar Studios, I always thought they got the best drum sound on any Zep record on Presence.

In Through The Outdoor is a bit of a marmite album you either love or hate it. You can tell Page & Plant weren't getting on by the amount of John Paul Jones on it. Carouselambra is my pick of the bunch.
Great album ! I still have mine also 🙌🏼
 

SomeBadDrummer

Platinum Member
One of my clearest memories of 1979 is my then-girlfriend (Cathy) brought the new Zeppelin over to my house. At age 15, we were excited to be listening to the first "current" Zep album of memory, and we couldn't wait to hear the band's latest iteration of its bombastic stomp and lyrics about druids and elves that our bong-wasted brains thirsted for.

In the Evening had the eerie tone we loved, and the profound thud of earlier LZ songs, but then turned into something almost danceable that we didn't quite understand.

On South Bound Saurez, our minds were reeling ... "Boogie-woogie piano from Zeppelin? Oof ... No thanks."

"Fool in the Rain" sounded perfectly packaged for FM radio and was probably our favorite, but then:

Hot Dog -- "What's this "Hee-Haw (expletive). This is awful. Are we missing some kind of joke here?"

I won't go through all 7 tracks, but that's still my reaction to the album as a whole. When I'm in the mood for Led Zeppelin, "IttOD" is never what I reach for.
That's a brutally honest assessment, and one that I admit to basically agreeing with...Hot Dog is an enigma wrapped in a mystery, thinly disguised as faintly nauseating dog squeeze wafting its wretched stench through the entire album.
 

Pootle

Active Member
Interesting that Robert Plant references the stripped back nature of the 1980 set list. I almost prefer listening to bootlegs of those European shows over some of the 70s tours with the omission of 45 min renditions of D&C, No Quarter, Moby Dick etc - though I’m sure it was great on the night!
 

Huw Owens

Active Member
Nice Job!

Is this the photo? It appears that his stainless steel kit may have made an appearance on the album, which is cool to find out.

View attachment 124820

That is the exact one, yessir!

In the book I spoke of, it was printed smaller & it was hard to be sure if that was the steel kit or the semi-mythical silver sparkle one. Blown up to this size it's clearly steel.

:)
 

opentune

Platinum Member
Watched all parts now, great documentary if you're a Zep fan. Some world political history mixed in there too. Signs of the times.
The drums sounds on this album are fantastic.
I like this album but its not for everybody. Carouselambra is a masterpiece, even the disco/techno part.
They definitely showed how they can nicely Zepp-ify any genre or musical influence.
 
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