I need that thick, deep, Nashville country music snare drum! What do I get?

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
Just as the title says. I'm playing a lot of country music, and I want that deep, rich country snare drum! What should I get?

Answers I'm not looking for:

You can play country music on anything: I know this already, but I'm looking for the right tool for the right job. In a bind, I'm sure I could possibly change a tire with vice grips, I'd rather use a tire iron.

It's all about EQ and compression in the studio: I know this too, but I also recognize signal chain as well. I'm not going to have the luxuries out in the wild.

It's all about attitude, not the gear: I don't know how much more country I can be living in the sticks in NC.

So what do you think? What am I looking for? I'd prefer to stay with maple, but I'm open. Thanks!
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
I'm curious about this too. I'm guessing that brass will be mentioned a few times. Maybe a Black Beauty?
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
The right tool for the right job: I play mostly country. The "Nashville" sound I think you're alluding to is more associated with tuning than with a "thick" or "deep" snare shell. In fact, shallower snares (5" or 5.5") can often sound better at lower tunings than deeper snares can. Head choice and tension play a big role in this domain.

If you want a deeper shell and you like maple, you're choices are vast. A 6.5" Pearl Masters would be an excellent option.
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
Are you gonna play vintage 1950 to 1980's country music? Or more modern 2000's to present country music? Or all kinds of country music?
Are you playing live or in the studio?
Are you playing live with a large electric band or with a smaller acoustic band?

You might need two snare drums.
.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
If you want a deeper shell and you like maple, you're choices are vast. A 6.5" Pearl Masters would be an excellent option.
I've had my eye on one of these. I already have as Masters 5.5" snare, but I may go with the 6.5" as well. I'm wanting a snare I take to rehearsals and practice with and the other one to keep with the kit I travel with.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
I've had my eye on one of these. I already have as Masters 5.5" snare, but I may go with the 6.5" as well. I'm wanting a snare I take to rehearsals and practice with and the other one to keep with the kit I travel with.
One more thing about that "Nashville sound," PorkPie. While we all may associate certain characteristics with given breeds of music, there are as many drum sounds coming out of Nashville, as well as out of country as a whole, as there are drummers. I play almost all of my country with high-and-tight snare tunings, and I don't own a snare deeper than 5.5". That's the sound and feel I like, and it works just fine. No one has ever said, "Dude, this is country. Drop that damn snare tension." If you play your parts well, you're snare sound is of little import to anyone but you.

Regardless, I think you can get the sound you want with your current Pearl Masters 5.5". Again, tuning is the name of the game.
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
These are great questions HJ!



I play all kinds of country music, but primarily 2000's to present.



Live.




Both.
Great !!
Modern country is just like loud 70's rock and roll. You need two snare drums; one for electric country and one for softer acoustic country.
Snare one: Brass 5.5 x 14 for the electric band. Tuned low to medium. Dampen with Evens HD drum head.
Snare two: Wood vintage snare 5.5 X 14 with round over bearing edges for any softer acoustic songs. Tuned medium to hi.

.
 

NouveauCliche

Senior Member
I mean....why not play what one of the best Country drummer plays:

 

Stroman

Platinum Member
Just as the title says. I'm playing a lot of country music, and I want that deep, rich country snare drum! What should I get?

Answers I'm not looking for:

You can play country music on anything: I know this already, but I'm looking for the right tool for the right job. In a bind, I'm sure I could possibly change a tire with vice grips, I'd rather use a tire iron.

It's all about EQ and compression in the studio: I know this too, but I also recognize signal chain as well. I'm not going to have the luxuries out in the wild.

It's all about attitude, not the gear: I don't know how much more country I can be living in the sticks in NC.

So what do you think? What am I looking for? I'd prefer to stay with maple, but I'm open. Thanks!
The best thick, fat snare drum sound I've gotten has been achieved with a tip I learned from "Sounds Like a Drum." I took a regular Ambassador, put gaff/duct tape all the way around the underside of the head at the edge (so the tape is between the bearing edge and the head), and viola! The best, most responsive, least fickle muffled snare drum I've ever used. It worked well on both my Acrolite and my oak Musashi. So, I think you can get that sound with most drums.

Try it, I think you'll like it.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I mean....why not play what one of the best Country drummer plays:

Lol I'll give you 799 reasons!
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Thin, solid shell wood, 14 x 6 or thereabouts would be my suggestion. I like thinner depth shells for a lower tuning. Sounds backwards.

Some associate Country music with metal snares, some associate Country music with wood snares. What's your opinion Martin?
 

ineedaclutch

Platinum Member
Well, if you have the right attitude you can play country music on anything, because it is all about eq and compression anyway.

Anyhoodle, I would be looking at a thin wood snare, not too deep, low lug count, with rounded bearing edges to help quell the overtones of low tuning. Maybe an old Slingerland with rerings, Ludwig Pioneer or Standard, or redo the edges on a snare you already have.

You could also go with a thin steel or brass shell with a little muffling to get that chest smacking dooooosh.
 
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incrementalg

Gold Member
Country drummer gear varies as much as any genre. For flexibility and versatility, I say get a 6.5x14 supraphonic or black beauty. Moon gel or tape when you wanna deaden them or nothing at all when you want fat and open sound.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
Some associate Country music with metal snares, some associate Country music with wood snares. What's your opinion Martin?
I like the idea of a metal snare, but in my ever-present obsession with volume, I may opt for a wood snare. I like the warmth of wood.
 
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