Holy Grail of the Drum World?

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I can’t think of anything….except maybe a walnut Guru Drums kit in 40 years, when the wood has had a chance to age. Or any well-made rosewood single-ply or stave snare drum that’s at least 50 years old.

I’m happy with what I already have.
 

Cmdr. Ross

Silver Member
For me personally, as wrong as it sounds, I don't count mass produced drums as a Holy Grail...for myself personally. IMO the age of those drums are more responsible for the sound than the craftsmanship. I'm not stating this as fact, just how I feel about it. In my mind, a handmade drum that is/was loved, and was built with no compromises fits the bill more. Obviously, I am a big solid shell proponent so I'm very biased.
It's not wrong at all. "Holy Grail" can be as individual as a fingerprint. For some, it's a Black Beauty. Others, a stave built shell unlike any other in the world.
I'm the latter here for sure as I want something custom and personal.
 

pgm554

Platinum Member
I'm much more interested in vintage mics and pre-amps than I am in vintage shells.
A Telefunken U 47 with leather?
 

Bozozoid

Gold Member
I'm still searching for my holy grail. It's an entire drumset I actually like. If the day comes I won't be thinking holy grail..ill be thinking holy Shi*!.
 

BobC

Member
I love to find rare items that appeal to me, especially in drums.

My Luddie Vistalite is a rare kit in the finish coupled with its size. Not to say there’s not, but I’ve seen maybe one other Ruby Vista Power Factory or Octaplus configuration, that’s a rare item not Holy Grail.

When I hear Holy Grail in drum terms it often is accompanying Rogers Mardi Gras finish.

It’s not the end all be all, but it is considered a rare and coveted instrument. The fact that I also have the cocktail floor makes it that much more so.
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I mentioned Mardi Gras in an earlier post. I love that finish. Great looking set.

I'll add Ludwig's Autographs Of The Stars finish also. Extremely rare.
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
My personal Holy Grail was an inexpensive Ludwig Supraphonic snare. Now that I have one (a 1970), I'm not sure what will take its place.

I've played 1960's Gretsch and Ludwig kits and they're good but they feel brittle to me. Something newer perhaps, Like a USA Custom or a Walnut Renown?

Great question!
 

Chris Whitten

Silver Member
This is why I figured I would throw it out there. After 40 years or so of playing the drums, I haven't heard anywhere near the specificity with regards to "holy grail drums/cymbals" vs. the universal acknowledgment of such items in the guitar world which drive prices of such items into the stratosphere.....add in provenance and you are talking crazy figures.
But there are....
The most coveted and expensively valued percussion items are 1920's Black Beauty snares, Gretsch RB drums in jazz sizes and orignal Istanbul K cymbals. Other things are worth a lot more now than they were when new, like the Tama Bell Brass snare and Paiste Sound Creation.
Whether you or I like them or not, these are the specific, high valued, rare items that are the equivalent of vintage guitars in the drum world.
 

Chris Whitten

Silver Member
I'm much more interested in vintage mics and pre-amps than I am in vintage shells.

Not much distinctive 'shell sound' actually makes it to a recording...or past a desk as you would see in most venues.
Studio players use vintage drums all the time. The Ludwig Black Beauty is a studio standard. Well known studio players record with keystone Ludwig a lot. People actually request I bring my Oaklawn Camco drums to sessions because they love the sound.
Despite being a Pearl endorser, Jeff Porcaro usually recorded with a Camco or vintage Grestch kit.
 

Otto

Platinum Member
Studio players use vintage drums all the time. The Ludwig Black Beauty is a studio standard. Well known studio players record with keystone Ludwig a lot. People actually request I bring my Oaklawn Camco drums to sessions because they love the sound.
Despite being a Pearl endorser, Jeff Porcaro usually recorded with a Camco or vintage Grestch kit.
yeah...loads of expensive equipment in use where the recording strips off the acoustic distinction...leaving a recording that could have been done on a set of old pacific grade shells.

Now, live low volume acoustic?...thats something else.
 

River19

Senior Member
But there are....
The most coveted and expensively valued percussion items are 1920's Black Beauty snares, Gretsch RB drums in jazz sizes and orignal Istanbul K cymbals. Other things are worth a lot more now than they were when new, like the Tama Bell Brass snare and Paiste Sound Creation.
Whether you or I like them or not, these are the specific, high valued, rare items that are the equivalent of vintage guitars in the drum world.

Fair points Chris. This is kinda what I was looking for. While everyone has their own particular taste, I think if a large group of drummers were surveyed many of the items you mentioned above would be in the "top 10".

Admittedly, my old Keystone Ludwig does make some studio magic, for a. certain vibe of songs it just sits perfectly in the music like no other snare I have does. I think the studio is where vintage collectible gear of all types still gets a workout. No reason to take extremely valuable, rare and sometime irreplaceable gear on the road or to gigs when there are many suitable options for live situations.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member
My personal holy grail is a gig where the guitar player is not super annoyingly loud.

and off time, and tuning without muting, and not putting 30 guitars on stage, but using only 2....
 

Chris Whitten

Silver Member
yeah...loads of expensive equipment in use where the recording strips off the acoustic distinction...leaving a recording that could have been done on a set of old pacific grade shells.
Take a project kit to any serious recording session and get back to me, LOL.
If you look at Aaron Sterling, Ash Soan, Jeremy Stacey, guys like that, they are all using a combo of high end pro kits and classic vintage.
 

Totigerus

Active Member
Early 80s Tama Bell Brass snare.
ya beat me to it! awe shucks! 😁

...but whoever said the top hat and cane finish luddies is probably the most "correct" just because of the combo of general drummer's community yearning mixed with it's availability. It's just I wouldn't play those like I would a 1980 tama bell brass 6.5X14. The luddies would just go in a glass case ☺️Screen Shot 2022-09-10 at 2.48.04 AM.png
 
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Totigerus

Active Member
I received an alert for this this morning. Not mine btw.
I'm no drum buying/selling expert by any stretch, but 800 seems kinda cheap for something so apparently rare. :unsure:
 

cbphoto

Diamond Member
For me, it's Slingerland Radio King snares

I am lucky to own one, I'd love more though.
I have a friend who has one. It is a beautiful sounding drum!
 
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