HARDWARE DIY/MODS/REPAIRS THREAD

boomboomda

Silver Member
Here is something I made also, I call it the self containing cymbal holder.
Our band practices at a rent by the hour rehearsal place, and of course you have to bring
your cymbals. But most of the time the felts were missing, or the wing nuts were missing or didn't fit the thread.
So I made those plastic things, bought some felts, so all I have to do now is put the cymbal in between the felts, screw the top black piece on, and just slide it on the the top of the existing cymbal stand.
 

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fijjibo

Platinum Member
Boom - Ive done that before now.

Works a treat, and protects your cymbals from bad stands.
 

GruntersDad

Honorary Lifetime CEO
Staff member
Its not pretty but it works well and keeps the chain out of the way of being hit with the stick.
Just some aluminum bar, and some rubber stopper chain...one piece cut in two to use the rings on the end. About 30 minutes worth of work. Enjoy.
 

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Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
Its not pretty but it works well and keeps the chain out of the way of being hit with the stick.
Just some aluminum bar, and some rubber stopper chain...one piece cut in two to use the rings on the end. About 30 minutes worth of work. Enjoy.

Hey, that's pimp. I like putting a ball chain on my ride sometimes but I hate how the stick hits the chain. What an elegant solution! Ima make one now.
 

Wavelength

Platinum Member
What an elegant solution! Ima make one now.

How do you find playing the bell with that device mounted on top of the ride? It seems to me that the only complete solution to the stick-hitting-the-chain-problem is to add an extra stand for the sizzle chain, which would be a rather dubious and, dare I say, hilariously in(s)ane. Then again, you could go a few bounds further, take a remote hat stand and turn it into a pedal operated and cable driven cymbal sizzlificator!
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
How do you find playing the bell with that device mounted on top of the ride? It seems to me that the only complete solution to the stick-hitting-the-chain-problem is to add an extra stand for the sizzle chain, which would be a rather dubious and, dare I say, hilariously in(s)ane. Then again, you could go a few bounds further, take a remote hat stand and turn it into a pedal operated and cable driven cymbal sizzlificator!


HAHA! Funny ideas.

You raise a good point. If you made Gruntersdad's current holder asymmetrical (both chains on one side, instead of one on each side) it would allow good access to the bell.
 

GruntersDad

Honorary Lifetime CEO
Staff member
I still use the bell. Just a little finesse is necessary.
 

boomboomda

Silver Member
I found a big sheet of plastic in my garage today, tossed in the garbage, got it back out
and made myself a music stand.
So I don't have to carry the one I have in the house back and forth.
The sheet of plastic was probably more expensive than a stand, but before I throw it away
I thought le me try it.
I cut it to the size I needed it drilled a hole in the top, glue a 90 degree angle aluminum
on the bottom and mounted the whole thing on a cymbal clamp on holder I had left over.
Here are some pics.
BTW it looks like the cymbal hit the stand , but there is enough clearance.
 

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Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
I found a big sheet of plastic in my garage today, tossed in the garbage, got it back out
and made myself a music stand.
So I don't have to carry the one I have in the house back and forth.
The sheet of plastic was probably more expensive than a stand, but before I throw it away
I thought le me try it.
I cut it to the size I needed it drilled a hole in the top, glue a 90 degree angle aluminum
on the bottom and mounted the whole thing on a cymbal clamp on holder I had left over.
Here are some pics.
BTW it looks like the cymbal hit the stand , but there is enough clearance.

Very cool! Using scraps is great. Gluing the aluminum strip was a smart move. How much did you have to shell out? Sounds like you had most everything on hand.
 

boomboomda

Silver Member
Very cool! Using scraps is great. Gluing the aluminum strip was a smart move. How much did you have to shell out? Sounds like you had most everything on hand.


I had everthing on hand, no money was required.
That was my goal, because a music stand is not very expensive.
 

Wavelength

Platinum Member
Recently I've felt that the spring in my hi-hat stand (Yamaha HS950) is too tight even in its loosest setting, and if I were to lower the footboard angle (which I'd like to experiment with) the spring compresses even tighter. Do you happen to have any ideas on how to loosen up the spring or even change it altogether?
 

boomboomda

Silver Member
Recently I've felt that the spring in my hi-hat stand (Yamaha HS950) is too tight even in its loosest setting, and if I were to lower the footboard angle (which I'd like to experiment with) the spring compresses even tighter. Do you happen to have any ideas on how to loosen up the spring or even change it altogether?


How old is your hi-hat stand? If it is older I would start with taking it apart and be sure that it is lubed where it suppose to be lubed, and for correct functionality.
I just looked at the stand at www.midwestpercussion.com
pretty heavy duty looking.
Sorry can't help more.
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
Recently I've felt that the spring in my hi-hat stand (Yamaha HS950) is too tight even in its loosest setting, and if I were to lower the footboard angle (which I'd like to experiment with) the spring compresses even tighter. Do you happen to have any ideas on how to loosen up the spring or even change it altogether?

The stand should have a spring tension setting somewhere, but maybe not.

Most hardware stores have a selection of springs. The springs used in hi-hat stands aren't particularly exotic. Remove your spring and take it there. You should be able to find springs of the same size that have different tensions. They're cheap and you can get a few and see what works for you.

Depending on the construction, you may be able to cut the spring. Shortening it would reduce its strength, but it might not fit inside the stand anymore. You should wear eye protection and gloves when cutting springs with a bolt cutter or hacksaw because the metal is very high-grade, tough and under considerable internal tension, so springs behave unpredictably when cut.
 

Tuxido

Silver Member
Cut one leg, pivoted the two others...

Photo46.jpg

Photo50.jpg




EDIT: my block pedal still doesn't fit...
 
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Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
Cool I have an old Tama stand I wanted to do that to, but the legs on that one do not rotate. I have to find a solution for mine too.

Gimping a hihat stand is a great mod. I did this with an old Tama as well. If you do it right it is completely reversible.

Look very carefully at how the tops of the legs are attached to a sliding collar and a fixed collar at the bottom. These collars are removable. I'm certain you could loosen and rotate them and re-tighten them.

So, you could remove one of the legs, then rotate the collars to the right position. The collar tightening mechanism might not be easy to adjust, so once you had the new position for the two legs you'd have to leave them there, but at least you'd shave off a leg from the stand.
 
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