HARDWARE DIY/MODS/REPAIRS THREAD

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
BASS DRUM INTERAL MIC MOUNT

I don't like a big hole in the bass drum head - it looks screwy being able to see inside the drum. Yet drums do sound better with internal miking and it's more convenient. I set out to mount my Audo Technica PRO-25 bass drum mic inside my 18 by 18 inch Spirit Dums solid ironwood shell. I showed an earlier version of this at http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/showthread.php?t=10 but this is the finished concept. No drilling into the shell was done.

These are the basic mount materials. I got an extra-deep nut to secure the lug and support the mic mount. The mount is 3/8 inch rod with a bolt welded to one end (goes in the lug nut) and bent to 90 degrees and threaded on the other end to accept the brass mic mount adaptor. I painted it black - just felt like it.


This is how the mic is mounted, looking toward the resonant head. After much trial and error and a couple of different sized mounts, I discovered that pointing the mic away from the batter head, toward and just a few inches from the resonant head, produced the fattest sound. I cut four 3/4 inch venting holes in the resonant head and glued black foam behind them, making them practically invisible from the outside. Venting was necessary as the airtight drum overpressured and produced a "piiiiing" sound, similar to slapping an inner tube.


View looking toward batter head, showing wiring through vent hole. I cut the XLR cable and soldered it to a Tip-Ring-Sleeve female socket, sometimes called a stereo-quarter inch. It fits a quarter-inch, but it's really wired like XLR. At the othe end of the cable I soldered a TRS male plug.


Outside view showing TRS plug going into shell. Now, miking the bass drum is as simple as slipping the plug into the socket.


Drumhead showing venting holes. If you look carefully, you may be able to see the four venting holes, located in an arc in the black dragon scales near the bottom of the head. They are invisible under stage lighting.
 
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fourstringdrums

Guest
Very nice once again man :) Have you every thought of patenting anything?

Got a question maybe you can answer...if you were going to shorter a hi-hat rod, what would be the easiest, cleanest way to do it. It's always bothered me having almost a foot and a half of rod that just gets in the way that I'm never going to use.
 

Ozzy Biz

Platinum Member
Do you have access to a drop saw and belt sander? Just cut with the saw and smooth back the edge on the sander; 2 minute job maximum. Failing that, you could do it with an angle-grinder and preferably also a vice. Again, just mark, cut and smooth up the rough edges a bit.

Biz
 
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fourstringdrums

Guest
Do you have access to a drop saw and belt sander? Just cut with the saw and smooth back the edge on the sander; 2 minute job maximum. Failing that, you could do it with an angle-grinder and preferably also a vice. Again, just mark, cut and smooth up the rough edges a bit.

Biz
Nope, I have neither...I'm not even sure what you mean by drop saw *lol* :) What are the cheapest tools that I could buy that would still do a pretty good job?
 

Ozzy Biz

Platinum Member
this is a drop saw


and this is a belt grinder



Hey, I don't have them at home either. Do you have any friends or family who rate themselves as reasonable handymen who may have these tools? Or possibly a fabricator/turner & fitter/etc who may let you do it or just do it for you?
It's a simple job; hell, my little sister could do it and she's in year 7. These aren't a necessity though.
If you don't know anyone who will let you use their shed for 5 minutes, there's the more labour intensive option..... the hacksaw and coarse grit sandpaper.
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
Nope, I have neither...I'm not even sure what you mean by drop saw *lol* :) What are the cheapest tools that I could buy that would still do a pretty good job?
After 20 years of service, my hihat pull rod was bent beyond repair last year and I made a new one. I purchased the cold-rolled steel rod, cut it and threaded it.

But just chopping one down is easier. You'll need a hacksaw to cut the rod. Then you'll need to file or grind down the remaining pull rod so it doesn't scratch you. You can pick up metal files and hacksaws in the discount bin at Ace hardware or the neighborhood dollar store. Really, a drop saw and belt grinder would be overkill for a task like this. You could do it for a couple of bucks in tools and a little elbow grease.

You should have a vise, though. A decent vise is at the heart of any workshop and essential for all sorts of stuff. Are you married? You can justify tool expenditures to the wife if you start fixing stuff around the house. Plus, that will improve your tinkering skills. I've been collecting tools seriously for about 15 years and I'm always trying to fix or make something. Like drumming, it's a fun skill to have and another creative outlet.

I went by a place this afternoon that makes gaskets here in town and they just gave me 10discs, 9 inches in diameter, made of tough flexible rubber about 1/16 of an inch thick. I used a hole punch to put a half-inch hole in the center of each one and they'll go between my cymbals while in transit (I use a Humes & Berg Enduro case and they sometimes rattle against each other). I suppose I could also use the discs as mufflers, or get some more of this material to make my own custom mufflers for drums and cymbals - they're made of the same stuff as the purpose-made mufflers, but they're much, much cheaper and you can make them to your own specifications.
 

Ozzy Biz

Platinum Member
Really, a drop saw and belt grinder would be overkill for a task like this. You could do it for a couple of bucks in tools and a little elbow grease.
Yeah, but I'm lazy. If I was sitting there in a workshop with a rod to be cut down, i wouldn't consider the hack saw with a perfectly good drop saw just sitting there...
 
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fourstringdrums

Guest
After 20 years of service, my hihat pull rod was bent beyond repair last year and I made a new one. I purchased the cold-rolled steel rod, cut it and threaded it.

But just chopping one down is easier. You'll need a hacksaw to cut the rod. Then you'll need to file or grind down the remaining pull rod so it doesn't scratch you. You can pick up metal files and hacksaws in the discount bin at Ace hardware or the neighborhood dollar store. Really, a drop saw and belt grinder would be overkill for a task like this. You could do it for a couple of bucks in tools and a little elbow grease.

You should have a vise, though. A decent vise is at the heart of any workshop and essential for all sorts of stuff. Are you married? You can justify tool expenditures to the wife if you start fixing stuff around the house. Plus, that will improve your tinkering skills. I've been collecting tools seriously for about 15 years and I'm always trying to fix or make something. Like drumming, it's a fun skill to have and another creative outlet.

I went by a place this afternoon that makes gaskets here in town and they just gave me 10discs, 9 inches in diameter, made of tough flexible rubber about 1/16 of an inch thick. I used a hole punch to put a half-inch hole in the center of each one and they'll go between my cymbals while in transit (I use a Humes & Berg Enduro case and they sometimes rattle against each other). I suppose I could also use the discs as mufflers, or get some more of this material to make my own custom mufflers for drums and cymbals - they're made of the same stuff as the purpose-made mufflers, but they're much, much cheaper and you can make them to your own specifications.
Don't they make small cutting blades (circular) that you can attach to a power drill? Also doesn't a dremel bit come in handy for smoothing out metal?
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
Don't they make small cutting blades (circular) that you can attach to a power drill? Also doesn't a dremel bit come in handy for smoothing out metal?
I've never heard of metal cutting blades that attached to a power drill. How could it work? Power drills are low speed/high torque and a round blade would make it difficult to control, maybe even a bit dangerous. As I recall, pull rods are 3/16 or 1/4 inch. A hacksaw would go through that in 10 seconds, assuming the rod is in a vise. While a hacksaw is low speed, the blade is straight so you can control it.

There are small grinding stones that attach to hand drills and those are useful. I didn't know you had a hand drill. What all sorts of tools do you have?
 
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fourstringdrums

Guest
I've never heard of metal cutting blades that attached to a power drill. How could it work? Power drills are low speed/high torque and a round blade would make it difficult to control, maybe even a bit dangerous. As I recall, pull rods are 3/16 or 1/4 inch. A hacksaw would go through that in 10 seconds, assuming the rod is in a vise. While a hacksaw is low speed, the blade is straight so you can control it.

There are small grinding stones that attach to hand drills and those are useful. I didn't know you had a hand drill. What all sorts of tools do you have?
I don't have many tools. I have the power drill, and then I do have a hack saw, but the blade is shot, so I'd have to get another one. I don't have a vice. I'm not the handiest guy with tools, hence the lack of them :)
 

Tama Player

Silver Member
BASS DRUM INTERAL MIC MOUNT

I don't like a big hole in the bass drum head - it looks screwy being able to see inside the drum. Yet drums do sound better with internal miking and it's more convenient. I set out to mount my Audo Technica PRO-25 bass drum mic inside my 18 by 18 inch Spirit Dums solid ironwood shell. I showed an earlier version of this at http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/showthread.php?t=10 but this is the finished concept. No drilling into the shell was done.

These are the basic mount materials. I got an extra-deep nut to secure the lug and support the mic mount. The mount is 3/8 inch rod with a bolt welded to one end (goes in the lug nut) and bent to 90 degrees and threaded on the other end to accept the brass mic mount adaptor. I painted it black - just felt like it.


This is how the mic is mounted, looking toward the resonant head. After much trial and error and a couple of different sized mounts, I discovered that pointing the mic away from the batter head, toward and just a few inches from the resonant head, produced the fattest sound. I cut four 3/4 inch venting holes in the resonant head and glued black foam behind them, making them practically invisible from the outside. Venting was necessary as the airtight drum overpressured and produced a "piiiiing" sound, similar to slapping an inner tube.


View looking toward batter head, showing wiring through vent hole. I cut the XLR cable and soldered it to a Tip-Ring-Sleeve female socket, sometimes called a stereo-quarter inch. It fits a quarter-inch, but it's really wired like XLR. At the othe end of the cable I soldered a TRS male plug.


Outside view showing TRS plug going into shell. Now, miking the bass drum is as simple as slipping the plug into the socket.


Drumhead showing venting holes. If you look carefully, you may be able to see the four venting holes, located in an arc in the black dragon scales near the bottom of the head. They are invisible under stage lighting.

Thats reall cool how the mic is wired and the venting holes are invisible. Thats really neat, if you ever sold any of that I would defintley look into it. Really, I would pay some good money for those. Or at least try and make them myself! : D

Peace
AGR
 
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fourstringdrums

Guest
Ok I shortened my hi-hat rod.

The hardware store didn't have any vice clamps left, so I used just a spring loaded clamp to hold the rod to the table.. Only $3. I then cut 8" off the rod. That of course took forever, and the blade kept hanging up so it made it take even longer, but it did it :)

I then used a power drill mounted grinder point to smooth the end, and round it off on the top slightly. That was only about $3 too.



As you can see from the side, it looks like a straight cut and not rounded at all, but from the top you can see the rounding a bit.





It looks pretty good actually, I really surprised myself. The top isn't flawless finish wise, a few scratches, but who cares :) I did make sure to set my hi-hat at the highest height, with the cymbals open the widest I would ever possibly use, just in case. I wound up having more left over than I originally measured, but it's enough to get out of the way of other cymbals and looks clean.

The final result:



I wound up spending $30 at the hardware store though because I had to get a new hacksaw blade and they only sell them in packs ($11) and then I had to buy a heavy dutry ice scraper $10, but that's unrelated to this :)

Thanks for all the help guys!
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
Ok I shortened my hi-hat rod.

The hardware store didn't have any vice clamps left, so I used just a spring loaded clamp to hold the rod to the table.. Only $3. I then cut 8" off the rod. That of course took forever, and the blade kept hanging up so it made it take even longer, but it did it :)

I then used a power drill mounted grinder point to smooth the end, and round it off on the top slightly. That was only about $3 too.

As you can see from the side, it looks like a straight cut and not rounded at all, but from the top you can see the rounding a bit.

It looks pretty good actually, I really surprised myself. The top isn't flawless finish wise, a few scratches, but who cares :) I did make sure to set my hi-hat at the highest height, with the cymbals open the widest I would ever possibly use, just in case. I wound up having more left over than I originally measured, but it's enough to get out of the way of other cymbals and looks clean.

The final result:

I wound up spending $30 at the hardware store though because I had to get a new hacksaw blade and they only sell them in packs ($11) and then I had to buy a heavy dutry ice scraper $10, but that's unrelated to this :)

Thanks for all the help guys!
Good job! Sounds like you thought it through in advance. I encourage you to try other mods and feel free to ask us all if you need advice.

Also, stop showing photos of your Bosphorus. I start drooling all over the keyboard and it gets messy!
 
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fourstringdrums

Guest
Good job! Sounds like you thought it through in advance. I encourage you to try other mods and feel free to ask us all if you need advice.

Also, stop showing photos of your Bosphorus. I start drooling all over the keyboard and it gets messy!
Probably the only other mod I may try is shortening a cymbal arm so it can be mounted off a bass drum tom holder.

Well once my Gretschs come in (IF they ever come in..they're supposed to be here today but DHL's tracking isn't updated and due to the "winter storms" we had on WEDNESDAY I may not have it until Monday, if it shows up at all, I'll post some pictures of the completed kit. So you'll have to see them again :)
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
Probably the only other mod I may try is shortening a cymbal arm so it can be mounted off a bass drum tom holder.

Well once my Gretschs come in (IF they ever come in..they're supposed to be here today but DHL's tracking isn't updated and due to the "winter storms" we had on WEDNESDAY I may not have it until Monday, if it shows up at all, I'll post some pictures of the completed kit. So you'll have to see them again :)
Tinkering with hardware is addictive. If you have the skill and inclination and a few more tools, I assure you, you'll be doing much more than just shortening cymbal arms. You already show good aptitude and resourcefulness in the improvised hihat holder.

Please do show us your new Gretsches when they come in. I get like a Pavlovian dog when I see a UPS truck, even if it's just next to me in traffic. I imagine it must have some cool drum stuff in there!

I checked out handidrummed.com and it's an inspiration. I was moved with the stories of people who drum despite missing limbs, nervous problems and joint conditions. It made me reflect on my own desire and commitment - if an accident or illness like that happened to me tomorrow (and it very well could), would I have the determination to find a way to keep playing drums somehow, some way? Your site should be required reading for all drummers, regardless of ability.

www.terrasonus.com
 
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fourstringdrums

Guest
Tinkering with hardware is addictive. If you have the skill and inclination and a few more tools, I assure you, you'll be doing much more than just shortening cymbal arms. You already show good aptitude and resourcefulness in the improvised hihat holder.

Please do show us your new Gretsches when they come in. I get like a Pavlovian dog when I see a UPS truck, even if it's just next to me in traffic. I imagine it must have some cool drum stuff in there!

I checked out handidrummed.com and it's an inspiration. I was moved with the stories of people who drum despite missing limbs, nervous problems and joint conditions. It made me reflect on my own desire and commitment - if an accident or illness like that happened to me tomorrow (and it very well could), would I have the determination to find a way to keep playing drums somehow, some way? Your site should be required reading for all drummers, regardless of ability.

www.terrasonus.com
Thank you very much, I appreciate it. I'm glad the site can help all drummers.

The Gretsch's didn't come. The seller used DHL and they quite frankly, suck. They lost a Pacific CX kit I ordered a few years ago. It was supposed to be delivered yesterday but it just arrived in the local facility this morning, so I'll have it monday hopefully. What I hate though is their tracking system is terrible. There are two tracking numbers, one of them still says it's in a transit facility in the next state, and the other tracking number which hasn't updated at all since he shipped it, now says it's in the local facility.

As long as they don't lose this one it'll be ok.
 
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Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
CYMBAL/PERCUSSION HOLDER

I hate putting just one thing on a stand. I saw I could use the built-in clamp on my tom stand to hold something, so this is what I came up with.

I started with 3/8 rod, then welded an 8mm (standard cymbal size) bolt to one end and threaded the other end for an extra-long nut. I cut plastic tubing to cover the bolt and prevent keyholing. I use Slicknuts and glue the felt to the washers, minimizing parts and fumbling during set-up and take-down.


This shows the LP Ice Bell and Pete Englehart agogo bells attached. After careful measurement, I put a bend in the rod.


The extra-long nut fits inside the tom stand clamp and holds the instruments securely. Because this is 3/8 inch rod, I can mount any standard percussion item to it - cowbells, blocks, tambourines, etc.


How it appears from above.
 
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fourstringdrums

Guest
Once again, sweet man :) That's great. I love the kit too. Those Fiberskyn(?) tom heads are very slick.

The only other thing I did lately was cut down and smooth/round down a bit the rod on my bass drum cowbell holder. It was getting in my way.
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
The only other thing I did lately was cut down and smooth/round down a bit the rod on my bass drum cowbell holder. It was getting in my way.
That's something a lot more drummers should consider doing. There are all sorts of rods and tubes that stick out way more than they should, adding weight and inconvenience to the set.

Also, thanks for the nice comments on the set. Imagine when those Zildjians are all swapped out for Bosphoruses!
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
LEGLESS HIHAT STAND

I like to cram a lot in a little space. When I got my new drum set in August, I started reconfiguring things and I discovered I could conserve space by removing the legs from my hihat stand and securing it to a cymbal stand. This is a fairly easy modification that saves space and weight.

Side view. The stand is an old Tama double-braced stand from 1985, the oldest item on the drum set. This stand has been with me for a long time and I wanted to use it, so I got a Dremel and carefully ground off the rivets holding the legs to the collars. I could re-assemble the legs if I ever needed to.


Close-up of the clamping system. It's an old CB700 cast aluminum clamp, mid-1980s vintage. They sure made some tough gear back then. I put Vecro inside the clamp jaws and on the cymbal and hihat stands. This marks the correct position for fast setup, protects the chrome and keeps the grip rock-solid.


Front view.


As used in the set. The control pedal for a foot-operated talking drum is on the left, while a DW5000 percussion foot pedal is on the right. I wouldn't have the room for all these pedals with a conventional tripod stand, or even a two-leg stand, owing to the proximity of the very large ride cymbal stand.
 
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