EAD10 vs 3 Mics

MSmithDW

Junior Member
Hey folks,

I've already got triggers on all my drums and already have a drum module to convert it to midi and send to my PC. I also already have an audio interface with inputs to spare. And I have a DAW and multiple drum VSTs. I now need a good recording solution for the drums. I don't need video. This is primarily for demo purposes and band practice (with good recordings desired) and not for professional results that you'd find on an album (I don't have the audio tech chops to pull that off anyway) and not for gigging.

I'm debating between the EAD10 and going with a 3 mic solution. This is my pros/cons list. I'm not gonna mention triggering options or EQ'ing, because I already have that.

EAD Pros:
* Simplicity. No extra stands, fewer wires. Built-in mixing. Turn on and go.

EAD Cons:
* From what I understand, recording isn't as good as a traditional 3 mic setup
* More than double the cost of some cheap mics that still have good reviews (like the Pyle Pros)
 

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
I just purchased a used EAD10 off Reverb about 30 minutes ago! It comes with 4 Yamaha triggers included, so it'll be interesting to see how additional triggers work with the unit. I didn't get it for recording purposes as much, but more as a practice tool to inspire creativity and get me to practice more.

Nearly everything I've heard about the EAD10 is good. The one caveat though, is that using any more than the standard 4-piece or 5-piece setup can be dicey. For example, if you have 2 floor toms, the 2nd one will be further away from the module, so it will not be as prominent in the mix.

And if you have a ride cymbal directly over your bass drum (where the module is), it might be a little too loud. But I think the Pros (like ease-of-use) far outweigh the Cons.

We shall see!
 

sumdrumguy

Senior Member
@MSmithDW If you didn't already own all the gear you have, I would whole-heartedly recommend the EAD. It is perfect for your needs.

Given what you already own, mics will definitely be the cheaper option. If you set up a knee mic - placed to the right of/just above your kick, facing the snare - you will capture the kit in a similar way to the EAD. Not the same, as the EAD has two condensors.


@IBitePrettyHard Nice score! With the firmware v2 update, the EAD does a much better job with larger kits. Adding triggers to a kit is a breeze.

That YT channel has a few videos on multiple trigger setups with the EAD. It got me revisiting the EAD.

I currently have my EAD setup with 6 mono triggers, plus the sound from the condensors capturing the acoustics. Wanted to see how far I could push the unit.

Once gigs start, I will be using the EAD for triggering, as a metronome, and personal monitor mix.
 
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yammyfan

Senior Member
I have a set of Pyle mics and they're decent. I don't record myself but I expect they'll be fine for my purposes when I do. They were fine when I tried them briefly after purchase.
 

ronyd

Silver Member
Tough question. 3 mics setup you will have more mixing and recording capabilities with a mixer and DAW. That’s if you already have a mixer or audio interface and a computer.

but, the EAD10 is such a nice package. I have both. mixer, audio interface, mics and now the EAD10. I like it because do easy to record and playback. If you have an iPad, use the ead10 app and you have video recording also.
 

MSmithDW

Junior Member
Thanks everyone! It's what I thought, but just wanted some confirmation on and you guys delivered.

Conclusion I'm hearing: EAD10 is a great solution and a highly recommended package, however if you already have much of the equipment and just need to choose between cheap mics and an EAD10 for audio recording purposes, it probably makes sense to just go with the mics. You will sacrifice some simplicity in exchange for some better quality recordings while also saving some cash.

Thanks all!


Side note: I wish the EAD10 included 3 mic inputs (2 OH and 1 kick). I think I'd be getting it if it did. Just don't want to spend $500 on a solution that isn't more open to growing down the line. Likewise, why do they only include enough trigger inputs for a 4 piece set? 5 Piece sets have to have at least 50% of the market. I think you might be able to Y-cable your way out of it, but still...odd design choice. Yamaha...Hope you're reading!
 
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mikyok

Platinum Member
Sorry guys late to the party on this one.

I use both for recording. I use x2 overheads and a kick Glyn Johns style which gives me a nice stereo picture of the kit. I use the EAD10 to mix different flavours in. It's great if you need to record and sound modern and vintage but you only have one kit. Also it makes your drum mixes sound better.

I got the EAD10 for practice and live (most of my gigs don't need a full set of mics). I've acquired some decent mics over the years so getting a cheap behringer 4 channel interface wasn't breaking the bank as well as the EAD10.
 

sumdrumguy

Senior Member
Side note: I wish the EAD10 included 3 mic inputs (2 OH and 1 kick). I think I'd be getting it if it did. Just don't want to spend $500 on a solution that isn't more open to growing down the line. Likewise, why do they only include enough trigger inputs for a 4 piece set? 5 Piece sets have to have at least 50% of the market. I think you might be able to Y-cable your way out of it, but still...odd design choice. Yamaha...Hope you're reading!

The EAD is compact. Not much room on the back for additional inputs.

Using splitter cables on two of the inputs, you can trigger a 6 piece kit. Adding Yamaha 3-zone pads to the other two inputs (5+6), the number of triggered surfaces jumps to 10.

Re additional mics.

I have read other EAD users had success with additional mics plugged into a sub-mixer, and then run into the EAD to add the scene/effects.

As the sensor contains two condensor mics, and the line from it is a stereo/TRS, there should be a way to split that signal for say a single overhead and kick mic, two overheads, or a Glyn Johns type setup.

I have yet to try it, but do plan on exploring mic options.
 

michaelg

Member
Judging alone by youtube vids, I prefer the sound of traditional mics over the EAD which to me makes drums sound synthetic and processed.
 

MSmithDW

Junior Member
EAD users had success with additional mics plugged into a sub-mixer, and then run into the EAD to add the scene/effects
This would be interesting. Does it just become apart of the mix? As if the additional mics were part of the included mic array? I didn't think the EAD10 had an input for this?
I prefer the sound of traditional mics over the EAD which to me makes drums sound synthetic and processed.
You can do recordings without the electronic drum sounds. You can also optionally add EQ, or just take the output from the included mic array. The e-drum sounds are really just if you're looking to convert it into an e-drum set (which you could do by switching to mesh heads and low volume cymbals), or a hybrid set, or are just looking to have fun with that feature. Having owned a e-set for 15+ years, I agree, that feature doesn't offer value to me, but it's just one feature/option, and it provides others as well (which are the ones I'd be interested in).
 

sumdrumguy

Senior Member
This would be interesting. Does it just become apart of the mix? As if the additional mics were part of the included mic array? I didn't think the EAD10 had an input for this?

This afternoon I close mic'd snare, rack and floor tom into a Mackie 1202 micro. Ran the Mackie mains out, using a 2x mono/ts to 1x trs cable, and plugged that into kick input B on the EAD. Input B is for the mics on the EAD sensor.

I used the Mackie to set levels for the drums, and the EAD to add effects/scenes to the overall drum sound.

It worked like a charm.

This was quick test to see if the sub-mixer idea worked. With more mics and a larger mixer, one could mic a large kit evenly, and send the signal through the EAD for effects.
 
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michaelg

Member
You can do recordings without the electronic drum sounds. You can also optionally add EQ, or just take the output from the included mic array. The e-drum sounds are really just if you're looking to convert it into an e-drum set (which you could do by switching to mesh heads and low volume cymbals), or a hybrid set, or are just looking to have fun with that feature. Having owned a e-set for 15+ years, I agree, that feature doesn't offer value to me, but it's just one feature/option, and it provides others as well (which are the ones I'd be interested in).
I was actually referred to the sound flat without any added sounds. I think yamaha may have some processing going on regardless. Or maybe its just I'm not a fan of the EAD mic and where it must be positioned.
 

MSmithDW

Junior Member
Input B is for the mics on the EAD sensor.

I used the Mackie to set levels for the drums, and the EAD to add effects/scenes to the overall drum sound.
Oh I didn't realize it worked that way. So essentially on the module you could connect any mic as a replacement to the built-in mic on the kick. Sweet! That's good.

I ended up buying a set of 7 cheap Pyle mics (good reviews), but in the future I could always add this if I wanted the scenes. I saw some mixers have built-in FX like the Mackie Mix 12 FX mixer. Wonder if they're equivalent to the EAD Scenes. Regardless...cool stuff!
 

MSmithDW

Junior Member
I was actually referred to the sound flat without any added sounds. I think yamaha may have some processing going on regardless. Or maybe its just I'm not a fan of the EAD mic and where it must be positioned.
Gotcha! And good to know! Thanks!
 

sumdrumguy

Senior Member
Oh I didn't realize it worked that way. So essentially on the module you could connect any mic as a replacement to the built-in mic on the kick. Sweet! That's good.

I ended up buying a set of 7 cheap Pyle mics (good reviews), but in the future I could always add this if I wanted the scenes. I saw some mixers have built-in FX like the Mackie Mix 12 FX mixer. Wonder if they're equivalent to the EAD Scenes. Regardless...cool stuff!

Well, as I said in my first reply above, you are probably good with the mics, triggers, DAW and drum VSTs you already own. It may take some tinkering, but I am sure you can create sounds/scenes with what you have that will suit your taste.


For those with an EAD wanting to explore alternative mic-ing. I wouldn't recommend connecting mics directly to the module. Plug the mics into a sub-mixer, set the levels there, then run the combined signal through the EAD.

I have since done the experiment above with a larger kit. Close mic'd the drums, plus two overheads and a room mic. I ran the close mics through the sub-mixer --> EAD --> main mixer/interface, and the overheads and room mic to the main mixer/interface. Cool to hear the same kit captured from inside (close-mics+EAD) and outside (overheads+room mic), with effects/scenes (through EAD) and without.

I have no idea if I will ever use this. Unlikely. However it is passing time :D
 

Living Dead Drummer

Platinum Member
If it's EAD10 vs 3 mics, I say EAD10. I use to all the time for demos with different artists. It gives a fantastic balance of the entire kit, and it you need a little extra push on the drums you can use the triggers and mix them higher than the mics on the module.
In fact, I also run the EAD10 dry in regular pro sessions where the kit has a dozen mics on it. It's nice to tuck in a mix as just an extra stereo mic from the center of the kit.

Never been a fan of the 3 mic setup just because I want more control on the kit, but I've had no problems falling in love with my EAD10.
 

True Arcadio

New Member
Does anyone know how to send any direct out of just the trigger audio to Front of House using EAD10?

I only want to send the triggered kick audio to front of house (because I don't want to risk feedback issues and my kit will be fully mic'd anyway). I don't want to get rid of the microphone audio in my headphones because it's a quick and easy way to have live monitoring through my headphones without needing to bring a mixer and spend a lot of time on levels.

If someone could figure out how to do this you'd be a life saver.
 

spleeeeen

Platinum Member
I bought a dedicated bass drum trigger and made the "underhead" condensers portable by mounting the unit on a goose neck mic holder. IMG_0151.JPGIMG_0155.JPG
 
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