Drumming and martial arts

Hewitt2

Senior Member
If pressure point attacks have no value, why are they banned in the UFC? All the Eastern systems use eye attacks, throat attacks, etc.. Of course, there’s no taking it back if you blind someone , or rupture their carotid sinus, break off an arterial plaque in the neck and cause a stroke or clot in the brain, etc.,

I’m not talking about these things because I watched a movie. *shrug* and this isn’t open for argument, as far as I’m concerned.

I keep asking for evidence and you’re not showing anything other than someone striking an inert watermelon and making general arguments. So at this point I’m out.

But all I will say is good luck getting an eye attack in on against someone properly trained in modern martial arts. Sure it’s banned, but so are hair pulling, groin attacks, using abusive language, etc. So I’m puzzled by your insistence that learning these techniques in non-live environments would make them suddenly useful when you have adrenaline and an adversary honing in on you.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I keep asking for evidence and you’re not showing anything other than someone striking an inert watermelon and making general arguments. So at this point I’m out.

But all I will say is good luck getting an eye attack in on against someone properly trained in modern martial arts. Sure it’s banned, but so are hair pulling, groin attacks, using abusive language, etc. So I’m puzzled by your insistence that learning these techniques in non-live environments would make them suddenly useful when you have adrenaline and an adversary honing in on you.

Do you not think people who train in the better eastern systems fight in class? You can train with eye and throat attacks at full speed, you just pull the technique at the point of contact. I don’t know why you are stuck on this. Why do you care? I didn’t start this thread to argue about boxing. Maybe try some martial arts forums if you want to dig deep. I really started this thread for other reasons. *shrug*
 

Spreggy

Silver Member
Good Southern-Style Kung Fu is way better than Western boxing. It utilizes both open-handed and closed-handed attacks, employs eye/throat/pressure-point attacks, and uses hand-training techniques and joint locks and trapping that would frustrate and easily incapacitate the best Western boxers. There’s not even a comparison. Sorry.

As far as kicking goes, Northern Chinese Kung Fu beats any other system.

If you want to talk about SPORT martial arts, that’s a different story. *shrug*
This is utter crap. But if it keeps you in shape that's all that really matters.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
This is utter crap. But if it keeps you in shape that's all that really matters.

Like I said, this was not my intention to have the discussion go in this direction. However, I’m out of patience with you all on this issue, and have, at least for the moment, given up on the direction I wanted to go with the discussion. I got nothing against you, bro, but please just let this discussion die. Thanks. Your cooperation is appreciated.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Well the only solution is a dance off or a beer summit. I vote beer summit. Y'all get drunk and then try your "marital arts" -that big fella in New Orleans could barely stand he was so drunk-my Momma could have beat em up LOL. I'd suggest a smoke out-but we can't bring that up-oops. I doubt there would be much fighting- more meditation. I think we need to meditate on the subject. My Mom would tell me that-You need to meditate on that.
Were you folks drawn to martial arts for discipline, meditation, or to kick butt and violence? I was drawn in high school because Kung Fu was popular on TV, Buddy Rich was into it, everyone loved Bruce Lee, it was a cultural thing really-interest in a new culture-peace but be ready to kick butt. But I cannot deny I was attracted to the violence too, but I think the impact was just the opposite.

For me personally-though I didn't keep up with it-it influenced me in really positive ways to help me deal with my bad temper and rage (I didn't learn to kick butt). It wasn't about being pumped up on adrenaline and killing your opponent-dang it. No it was logical, methodical, and you train your body and muscle memory to react to protect, defend, neutralize-just like you train your body for drums. I think my older bros torturing me part of my childhood just gave me a short fuse and a big chip-I was always looking for a trap and be ready to fight or flight for my life-they were a lot older so felt I was terrorized-also lots of other bullies-crazy people just mean as hell. No worries I got older (got in shape) and got even-no I didn't kill them but if I had killed my eldest brother a judge would probably give me a medal LOL. I forgave them it's kid stuff-being terrorized is normal part of development in US to create the normal dysfunctional family. I think a lil Spartan draconian terror can be good actually because it motivated me to lift weights, run, try jiu jitsu, meditation, start focusing which I had a huge issue with, and deal with rage issues. So I got motivated to get in shape to actually fight the monsters but what it did is help me see my own monster. That was the beginning of seeing how it all had impacted me-almost like PTSD. So oddly it all worked out I guess. My crazy GrandDad would take a cow prod to myself and my two bros-so perhaps I was just a domino in a bigger scheme I wasn't seeing ROFL.
 

nicholasBR

Well-known member
Good Southern-Style Kung Fu is way better than Western boxing.
I would say in real, one-on-one fights what counts are size (weight), experience and stamina. These are more important things than any particular style. The bigger, fitter, guy who's had lots of fights in any style will beat the smaller, unfit guy who's only trained in the gym or dojo regardless of style. Of all 3 of those things I'd say experience is what counts the most. Even a big, fit guy can be beaten by the smaller, weaker fighter of any style who has seen all the scenarios before.

My 2 (Euro) cents.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I would say in real, one-on-one fights what counts are size (weight), experience and stamina. These are more important things than any particular style. The bigger, fitter, guy who's had lots of fights in any style will beat the smaller, unfit guy who's only trained in the gym or dojo regardless of style. Of all 3 of those things I'd say experience is what counts the most. Even a big, fit guy can be beaten by the smaller, weaker fighter of any style who has seen all the scenarios before.

My 2 (Euro) cents.

There are thousands of families in East Asia whose entire living is made from teaching martial arts. They start at age 4 or 5, and train hours a day for the rest of their lives. Also, they train to fight, not box. Which means eye pokes, bites to the face, throat strikes, etc., aren’t just allowed and taught; those techniques are ENCOURAGED as the fastest ways to end a fight. There’s just no comparison between someone trained 5 hours a day like that for 30 years, versus even the best boxers. Those systems just have thousands of hours more training, the difference in sheer hours of practice just isn’t even close. Not even close.

Plus, all eastern arts use kicks Have you ever seen the video of Kimbo Slice in the UFC? He had never faced a kicker before that day, and he lost in 15 seconds because of it.

Anyway, we’ve gotten way off topic. I really wanted to talk about the water-slapping stories in Chinese Kung Fu, and my own experiences with those arts and the first page of “Stick Control”. But we can keep pretending that western boxing is even comparable to the best eastern Kung fu. Lol
 

The Shepherd

Regular Poster
Why do all martial arts discussions end up going the "my dad can beat up your dad" way?

Can we discuss the merits of martial arts instead of waving our man parts at each other proclaiming which is supposedly deadlier?
 

The Shepherd

Regular Poster
Another thing that is similar between drumming and karate, changing up your routine is key to learning new techniques.

Our sensei has been actively been putting together different block / strike combinations that we don't regularly see or do in any katas. It makes you think and sometimes do things you're not accustomed to and it's difficult at first but gets easier over time. Same with drumming, doing something out of your normal beat or rhythm is hard at first but becomes easier over time. In doing so, it becomes easier to do other "unnatural" rhythms or fills and it can lead you down musical paths undiscovered.
 

SVBJECT

Regular Poster
So as a very recent development I've joined a mauy Thai club, and over the last couple of months have been really getting into it, and today a new guy joined our group, also a drummer, and the teacher specifically noted how we both have far better punches than anyone else he works with. Specifically, more strength and speed combined than he's used to, bigger guys have stronger sure, quicker guys have faster, but we both come very close to the top in both respects despite neither of us being particularly ripped or anything.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
So as a very recent development I've joined a mauy Thai club, and over the last couple of months have been really getting into it, and today a new guy joined our group, also a drummer, and the teacher specifically noted how we both have far better punches than anyone else he works with. Specifically, more strength and speed combined than he's used to, bigger guys have stronger sure, quicker guys have faster, but we both come very close to the top in both respects despite neither of us being particularly ripped or anything.

After about a year of doing the “big, slow, above-the-head” drum stroke practice, I was knocking on one of those full-door glass doors from the 50s, with the side of my fist. I was kind of frustrated that no one was coming to the door, but these weren’t full-arm swings, my hand was moving about 3 inches back and forth. The door broke. ?

Turns out those exercises combined with my years of martial arts training gave me a little more force then I realized I had. And I’m not a big guy, maybe 145 pounds.

There’s an old Chinese martial arts story with dozens of slight variations, but it’s very similar to my story



I see tremendous parallels between that kind of training and drumming.
 

DrumWhipper

Member
I train in Goju Ryu Karate, Kodokan Judo, and both Japanese and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu.
 
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