Drumming and martial arts

The Shepherd

Well-known member
Shotokan karate

I have found a few things that are similar between the two,

1 - They are both harder to do slowly, people have natural tempos.
2 - They are both about muscle memory. If you think about what you're doing too much you fall apart.
3 - You never do a kata or play a song the same way twice.
 
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Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
Probably a lot of ways to think about it.

They're both a journey and in the end I guess I approach them the same way and got rid of the "classical mess."
 

NackAttack

Well-known member
Not exactly martial arts, but in a fight you need to stay relaxed. If you tense up and waste all your energy right off the bat, the next few minutes are going to suck bad. No time-outs lol. When playing super fast genres like death metal you can’t exactly take a break in the middle of a set because you’re tired or your limbs can’t keep up. Your band mates want to do that crazy new song that tests your limits? Too bad, better find a way to conserve some energy. I know this doesn’t exactly apply to all genres and I guess it’s really more of an analogy than anything.
 

Hewitt2

Senior Member
I would say the softer arts like tai chi that I studied for a few years, while having little to do with practical self-defence, impart a sense of mindfulness, flow, and mind/body connection which indirectly contributed to my drumming growth.

Activities like yoga and meditation further these qualities and are beneficial with how we approach the instrument.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I would say the softer arts like tai chi that I studied for a few years, while having little to do with practical self-defence....

Tai Chi is a deadly art when taught correctly. So are all the internal arts, but Tai Chi has been co-opted as a health improvement method separate from its martial roots. The guy who came up with it, Zhao Kuangyin, was the head of the Emperor’s bodyguard, a TREMENDOUS fighter, and founded the Song Dynasty in 960 AD. Nothing in the history of the art, prior to the late 1900s, implies that it was ever meant to be a gentle “moving yoga” for the elderly. *shrug*
 

Hewitt2

Senior Member
So who are some modern MMA practitioners that use tai chi in the ring?

I’m sorry but I’m always very sceptical when I read about these supposedly deadly martial arts that for some strange reason have not been adopted by modern martial artists who stand to gain a lot of money and renown by using the most effective martial art techniques.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
So who are some modern MMA practitioners that use tai chi in the ring?

I’m sorry but I’m always very sceptical when I read about these supposedly deadly martial arts that for some strange reason have not been adopted by modern martial artists who stand to gain a lot of money and renown by using the most effective martial art techniques.

Tai Chi is a martial art, not a sport. It has some non-lethal stuff in it, but it’s mainly designed to kill/maim, not just score knockouts or submission tap outs. I’m not even sure how you’d turn it into an MMA-friendly style. I mean, the gentle parts of it are truly gentle, bounce outs and redirects and such. In an MMA match, those would be largely pointless, leaving you with nothing but far more serious stuff. Tai Chi doesn’t have much of a sport-ready middle ground. *shrug*
 

Spreggy

Silver Member
So who are some modern MMA practitioners that use tai chi in the ring?

I’m sorry but I’m always very sceptical when I read about these supposedly deadly martial arts that for some strange reason have not been adopted by modern martial artists who stand to gain a lot of money and renown by using the most effective martial art techniques.
I have to agree, a system has value as defense if it has proven itself in competition or real battle. Nothing rises above western boxing for the hands, and Muay Thai and Dutch kickboxing leg styles have risen to the top. Nothing beats Jiu Jitsu on the ground.
 

incrementalg

Gold Member
Tai Chi is a deadly art when taught correctly. So are all the internal arts, but Tai Chi has been co-opted as a health improvement method separate from its martial roots. The guy who came up with it, Zhao Kuangyin, was the head of the Emperor’s bodyguard, a TREMENDOUS fighter, and founded the Song Dynasty in 960 AD. Nothing in the history of the art, prior to the late 1900s, implies that it was ever meant to be a gentle “moving yoga” for the elderly. *shrug*
My friends mom has studied various martial arts for decades. Tai Chi being her preference and the one she’s studied longest. She’ll kill you quietly and gracefully...lol
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
My friends mom has studied various martial arts for decades. Tai Chi being her preference and the one she’s studied longest. She’ll kill you quietly and gracefully...lol

It’s rare to find a woman who’s willing to put in the time and energy to learn the internal arts. I’ve known one or two over the years.
 

pgm554

Platinum Member
Best example I know of is George Marsh and his application of Tai Chi to his teaching methods.
 

J-Boogie

Gold Member
Tai Chi is a deadly art when taught correctly. So are all the internal arts, but Tai Chi has been co-opted as a health improvement method separate from its martial roots. The guy who came up with it, Zhao Kuangyin, was the head of the Emperor’s bodyguard, a TREMENDOUS fighter, and founded the Song Dynasty in 960 AD. Nothing in the history of the art, prior to the late 1900s, implies that it was ever meant to be a gentle “moving yoga” for the elderly. *shrug*
Bolo was Tai Chi wasnt he...I wouldnt mess with Bolo
 

Ransan

Senior Member
It really works!

Last night while celebrating, my uncle got us into a situation where it was us two against 3.

Well I was having trouble applying sticking concepts. My uncle came into frame and whisked my opponent out quickly. From my analysis he paradiddle diddled the bleep out of that guy leading with the right foot. I looked over at the second who was out cold. Then fixing back to my uncle who was giving the last guy the ol’ 5 stroke jab finalizing with accented hook.

When we ran off into the night getting into the truck, I barely got out alive, but my bloodied up uncle broke our panting silence and then said “if I were as strong as Robert Sweet (who we know to kill a new skin with one stroke) this would’ve been over a long time ago.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
I’ve never used martial arts or boxing in a real fight but one time an older kid was bullying another in our neighborhood taking his bike and I intervened and decided to box him. He looked at me funny and proceeded to pound my head in- I did get the bike back though. No more trying to box in a real fight - no Marquess of Queensberry when other has no rules. So I learned to go for soft targets-eyes,throat, groin first then pound their head in. One of middle brother’s fraternity brother was a martial arts instructor and he had this power throw that nipped any further action in bud. I saw him action and he could use it effectively. But beware the yahoo who will ripe off your VW door and stick his pointy boot under the chin for the knockout-I thought that fella would die. I remember standing at a urinal in New Orleans and this drunk dude was staggering around the bathroom hitting walls snd mirrors saying he could woop everyone’s butt . Well me and this short fella standing there peeing started laughing at him . He bucked up and the short fella finished first turned around and got right up under his nose standing off . As I walked out the door the short fella was beating the big drunk fellas head in. I gave him the two thumbs up. LOL
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I have to agree, a system has value as defense if it has proven itself in competition or real battle. Nothing rises above western boxing for the hands, and Muay Thai and Dutch kickboxing leg styles have risen to the top. Nothing beats Jiu Jitsu on the ground.

Good Southern-Style Kung Fu is way better than Western boxing. It utilizes both open-handed and closed-handed attacks, employs eye/throat/pressure-point attacks, and uses hand-training techniques and joint locks and trapping that would frustrate and easily incapacitate the best Western boxers. There’s not even a comparison. Sorry.

As far as kicking goes, Northern Chinese Kung Fu beats any other system.

If you want to talk about SPORT martial arts, that’s a different story. *shrug*
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
My wife actually likes Steven Seagal movies- so we enjoy watching together. He seems to have turned into a douche with age though. I don’t like to carry a pistol cause my hot temper I couldn’t imagine if my body was a lethal weapon. Oops I’m sorry my wife is on my back, I’m in a bad mood and now you’re my literal whipping post- so the Ninja death punch just sorta slipped out from all the training - my bad.
 

nicholasBR

Well-known member
Has anyone studied both, and got thoughts about the differences/sameness between them?
I did Thai boxing for long time. Fought at home and in Thailand. The similarities are they're both extremely difficult to do well and are dominated by males. The differences is the stink of feet in a Thai boxing gym versus in a band practice room. ...maybe that's not so different actually.
 

Hewitt2

Senior Member
Good Southern-Style Kung Fu is way better than Western boxing. It utilizes both open-handed and closed-handed attacks, employs eye/throat/pressure-point attacks, and uses hand-training techniques and joint locks and trapping that would frustrate and easily incapacitate the best Western boxers. There’s not even a comparison. Sorry.

As far as kicking goes, Northern Chinese Kung Fu beats any other system.

If you want to talk about SPORT martial arts, that’s a different story. *shrug*

I think you’ve been watching too much blood sport. Lol. Sorry but the proof is in the ring. There is no evidence that these esoteric “deadly” martial arts have any effectiveness at all.

martial arts that have been honed in the ring with real live combatants (western boxing, bjj, muay Thai, etc) are effective precisely because they are constantly being tested and refined in a live environment. These traditional systems that are not fully tested are akin to learning to dance. Harsh but true.

pressure point systems like dim mak or traditional martial arts like Kung fu have no proven dominance in the real world against mma-style fighting..

this is why Bruce Lee turned away from traditional arts like wing chun 45-years ego and embraced a melange of western styles of martial arts because the proof was on the mat.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I think you’ve been watching too much blood sport. Lol. Sorry but the proof is in the ring. There is no evidence that these esoteric “deadly” martial arts have any effectiveness at all.

martial arts that have been honed in the ring with real live combatants (western boxing, bjj, muay Thai, etc) are effective precisely because they are constantly being tested and refined in a live environment. These traditional systems that are not fully tested are akin to learning to dance. Harsh but true.

pressure point systems like dim mak or traditional martial arts like Kung fu have no proven dominance in the real world against mma-style fighting..

this is why Bruce Lee turned away from traditional arts like wing chun 45-years ego and embraced a melange of western styles of martial arts because the proof was on the mat.

If pressure point attacks have no value, why are they banned in the UFC? All the Eastern systems use eye attacks, throat attacks, etc.. Of course, there’s no taking it back if you blind someone , or rupture their carotid sinus, break off an arterial plaque in the neck and cause a stroke or clot in the brain, etc.,

I’m not talking about these things because I watched a movie. *shrug* and this isn’t open for argument, as far as I’m concerned.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
THIS is why good Eastern systems beat Western. Best in mind, this guy is nowhere near the top in terms of hand training. He’s mid-level.

 
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