best seamless aluminum snare?

Drum Guy

Member
saw a couple videos on the YAMAHA RC and Noble Cooley, both of which I like but Yammy I can afford more so (though I do have a 2019 N&C 5x14 SS walnut, wonderful)...

So I cant seem to find if the Yamaha aluminum is seamless(?) trying to narrow it down between TAMA, Yammy or Ludwig supra. All 3 are seamless?

Oh no...then there's Oriollo, very open sound, but harder to purchase?
 

Drum Guy

Member
I currently own and have for sale :) mint condition DW 1mm aluminum non-beaded, non-seamless, welded snare. It's good but not as I'd like after hearing the Yammy and Ludwig
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
For an open sound, an 8-lug Oriollo Phantom is hard to beat. I have two copper Oriollos and a brass one, but their lugs and hardware are super-light, and Vukan at Oriollo is easy to deal with.
 

KEEF

Senior Member
I have the Starphonic and absolutely love it.....if I was only allowed one snare forever more,this would be it!!
 

donzo74

Junior Member
I want the new Yamaha Recording Custom 14x6.5 aluminum with the seamless beaded shell and those monster diecast hoops. As it is, I have a 5" Acro and both 5 and 6.5" Supras so it's not a real pressing need. I'll pull the trigger on that eventually, I'm sure.
 

Rattlin' Bones

Gold Member
Dry is good if you plan on recording. The engineer will want to eliminate as much ring as possible. My Acro Black Galaxy is very dry and good for that function, as is the vintage Premier. I'd rather use a dry snare than have to attempt to mute with Moon Gel or even my wallet. Another good thing about the vintage snares is they have internal mufflers, so you can control the openness and ring/ dryness.
 

Rattlin' Bones

Gold Member
Lots of vintage aluminum snares had seams. Slingerland for one. The shell was riveted together.

Dry is good if you plan on recording. The engineer will want to eliminate as much ring as possible. My Acro Black Galaxy is very dry and good for that function, as is the vintage Premier. I'd rather use a dry snare than have to attempt to mute with Moon Gel or even my wallet. Another good thing about the vintage snares is they have internal mufflers, so you can adjust the openness and ring/ dryness.
I'm struggling to think of an aluminum snare with a seamed shell.
 

Jeremy Bender

Platinum Member
Not sure of the style you play or size you're after, but to my ears this is the finest sounding aluminum snare I've head. Amazing dynamic range and sensitivity.
 

Drum Guy

Member
Thanks to all for such a wealth of opinions and options - great forum - me thinks I'll get the Yamaha as it's more affordable than these Joyful Noise and N&C high end great sounding snares - TAMA was my second close runner up for price and quality.
 
Maybe I'm being a bit biased about this (although the only Ludwig drums I've ever owned are a couple of Acrolites) but I see it like this:

There's the Ludwig Supraphonic, and there are all of the other drums trying to imitate the Supraphonic.

As for the Acrolite, there are a couple of key differences:

1.) Different finish - anodized rather than Chromed - some think the Acrolite is slightly drier than the Supra
2.) Different style and number of lugs - I know that the new Acrolite has 10 lugs, but older ones only had 8. To me, this is a non-issue

That's pretty much it - it's the same drum with different lugs and a different finish. Even the hole spacing on the lugs is the same - the Imperial lug is drilled at the same distance as the Acrolite bowtie lug.

In my observations, the 5" Acrolite is drier than a 6.5 Supraphonic, but if you don't want dry, maybe brass is a better way to go.

If I was in your shoes, I'd get a Ludwig, and probably the Supraphonic. Again, IMO, everything else is just trying to be a Supraphonic.
I have both of these fine drums, and find I prefer the wetter, more polished tone of the Supraphonic. However, and perhaps it's just me, but my Pearl Sensitone 5×14 represents a nice affordable cross in performance between the two. Probably closer to the Acrolite, overall, with it's brushed shell and drier sound.
 
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