Best Double Bass Drum Pedal

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Did they play the song that has sword fight clang sounds in it?
My bass player and I hung out at the merch table during the show. The girl at their merch table knew their whole show word for word. She would say it, then they would say it. Everything about their show was rehearsed.

They closed the show with The Glory of Achilles. That's a pretty tough song.
 

SVBJECT

Active Member
So I have to confess in my youth I was terribly guilty of more gear = better drummer.
I had a kit and bought a duallist, it seemed like instant I-can-play-death-metal kinda thing. Yey great (I obviously couldn't!)
The next step, clearly, was to buy a monster 10-piece kit, totally wasted on me, but there you go.
So, I OBVIOUSLY bought a second duallist pedal - playing quad pedals total sick no?
And instantly realized the required playing was actually far harder - I wasn't playing 1&2&3&4&, I had to play 1a--2a--3a--4a--, which, at any speed worth having the gear at all, was way above my ability to play tight.

Anyway, long story short, I never really utilized them, nor practiced engaging/disengaging the second pedal with my heals, whilst playing. However, I do still own them and have wondered if with my now more mature approach to learning to play the drums I would get some good results. I will wait until I feel constrained not having them before I try them out though I think.

I am currently using a pair of Tama HP200B, they're old but solid and I have no complaints. Again, when I am skilled enough to feel held back by them I'll know it's time to change.
 

NackAttack

Active Member
So I have to confess in my youth I was terribly guilty of more gear = better drummer.
I had a kit and bought a duallist, it seemed like instant I-can-play-death-metal kinda thing. Yey great (I obviously couldn't!)
The next step, clearly, was to buy a monster 10-piece kit, totally wasted on me, but there you go.
So, I OBVIOUSLY bought a second duallist pedal - playing quad pedals total sick no?
And instantly realized the required playing was actually far harder - I wasn't playing 1&2&3&4&, I had to play 1a--2a--3a--4a--, which, at any speed worth having the gear at all, was way above my ability to play tight.

Anyway, long story short, I never really utilized them, nor practiced engaging/disengaging the second pedal with my heals, whilst playing. However, I do still own them and have wondered if with my now more mature approach to learning to play the drums I would get some good results. I will wait until I feel constrained not having them before I try them out though I think.

I am currently using a pair of Tama HP200B, they're old but solid and I have no complaints. Again, when I am skilled enough to feel held back by them I'll know it's time to change.
I’d be more interested in one pedal that could work the left beater and hihat. I’m In a leg brace with my right foot and I can only play closed hats with my left foot on the slave pedal for the next 3 weeks. Possibly surgery after that.

I admittedly don’t know much about the Dualist pedals, but can’t you get the same results with heel toe on any pedal?
 

SVBJECT

Active Member
I’d be more interested in one pedal that could work the left beater and hihat. I’m In a leg brace with my right foot and I can only play closed hats with my left foot on the slave pedal for the next 3 weeks. Possibly surgery after that.

I admittedly don’t know much about the Dualist pedals, but can’t you get the same results with heel toe on any pedal?

Again the purchase was during a time in my youth when I favoured gear over skill 🤷‍♂️
Yes, I daresay you could near enough, although I suspect the twin duallist would win especially if the drummer had put in the hours practicing it more. But then again the word cheater floated about occasionally when I explained them to drummers and musicians before - I guess theres a line somewhere there that some people would see as dishonest but where you wanna draw it is your call...
 

NackAttack

Active Member
But then again the word cheater floated about occasionally… I guess theres a line somewhere there that some people would see as dishonest but where you wanna draw it is your call...
If I ever find a copy of the official drumming rulebook I’ll share what I find out. I’m sure it’s right after the section on triggers.
 

Rdhefner

Member
I've read that people don't like the quality of the new DW pedals. Is that true? I have an Iron Cobra right now, and I just don't love it. I have had DW 3000 in the past, and I liked the feel of it better than the Iron Cobra, so I was thinking of switching back, but I don't want to if the quality is lower. Can someone advise?
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
I've read that people don't like the quality of the new DW pedals. Is that true? I have an Iron Cobra right now, and I just don't love it. I have had DW 3000 in the past, and I liked the feel of it better than the Iron Cobra, so I was thinking of switching back, but I don't want to if the quality is lower. Can someone advise?
I haven't heard any complaints other than the relatively cheap double pedal drive u-joints. A pretty common complaint regardless of brand.
 

beedoola

Junior Member
For those with a double kick pedal. Do you ever remove the left pedal from your setup and just use the single kick or do you remove the whole pedal and have a dedicated single kick pedal you use?
 

JimmyM

Gold Member
For those with a double kick pedal. Do you ever remove the left pedal from your setup and just use the single kick or do you remove the whole pedal and have a dedicated single kick pedal you use?
I have early DW5000 single chain doubles and a Tama Power Glide single I'm bouncing back and forth on. Using the Power Glide when I only need a single would make life easier, but I'm pretty sure I prefer the DW, so I'll probably just detach the main one and take the second beater off.
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
Yeah, we should have just stopped at Maiden, Priest and Sabbath and not evolved or tried anything new.
Get off my lawn!! ?
That's my point. It should have evolved, not devolved.

It has done both, really. Just like rock and roll, country, pop, etc. My biggest problem with most new stuff is the sameness. Not just the playing but the mix. Sounds like the same drum samples on 90% of albums.
 

notvinnie

Senior Member
While I might agree about the lacking harmony and melody, would you perhaps concede that meshuggah is quite rhythmically advanced beyond the 70’s metal that you seem most impressed with?
First, I'm not obsessed or impressed by 70's metal (which was just called 'Rock' back then). As for being rhythmically advanced, Frank Zappa was the king of using odd-groupings and polyrhythms within rock and pop music. But rhythmic sophistication on its own doesn't satisfy the palette. There should be a musical reason for every musical choice.
 

SVBJECT

Active Member
meshuggah is quite rhythmically advanced
That must be the understatement of the year.

Music requires rhythm, harmony and melody.
No it doesn't.
The vast majority of traditional non-European music lacks harmony. It's still music.
Drone and some chants etc lack rhythm but is still music.
Plenty of percussive music lacks melody and yet is still music.

You've described the three spheres one can judge music, musically, in. That doesn't mean all three must be present to call something music.
 

SomeBadDrummer

Platinum Member
For those with a double kick pedal. Do you ever remove the left pedal from your setup and just use the single kick or do you remove the whole pedal and have a dedicated single kick pedal you use?
I don't remove the left (slave) pedal unless there's no need for double. My Iron Cobra 600's ($99 used from the local shop) are awesome with excellent adjustments, feel, spring, and response. If I only need one pedal, I simply leave my left foot on the hi hat stand.
 

NackAttack

Active Member
They do for me to consider it music. For example, Rap doesn't qualify. You can call it art, or self-expression, but don't call it music.
Your post started strong stating that it was just your opinion aaaaaaaand then it crashed and burned 2 sentences later by telling others what they can and can’t think. Well done.
 

SomeBadDrummer

Platinum Member
I've read that people don't like the quality of the new DW pedals. Is that true? I have an Iron Cobra right now, and I just don't love it. I have had DW 3000 in the past, and I liked the feel of it better than the Iron Cobra, so I was thinking of switching back, but I don't want to if the quality is lower. Can someone advise?
This is a few weeks after you posted this, so hopefully this response won't get flagged as Ghost, zombie or anything else lol. DW makes fine gear as does Tama, not sure there is a significant difference in quality; it's more about what feels and works best for you. I have great IC double bass pedal and HH stand, but my snare stand is a fabulous DW 5000 or some version thereof which I found used but in mint condition at the local shop. I haven't bought anything new except sticks in forever.
 

SVBJECT

Active Member
They do for me to consider it music. For example, Rap doesn't qualify. You can call it art, or self-expression, but don't call it music.
So....there's an audible artform that involves rhythm and pitch etc but we're not to call music?
Sounds exciting, as I like things quite similar, namely music, but in absence of any other defining name, shall we call it musoc?
 

notvinnie

Senior Member
So....there's an audible artform that involves rhythm and pitch etc but we're not to call music?
Sounds exciting, as I like things quite similar, namely music, but in absence of any other defining name, shall we call it musoc?
"Speaking" in monotone isn't really "pitch" is it? I'm referring to certain instances of rap I've heard, which is just rhythmic noises (percussive samples) with words spoken rhythmically (albeit, sometimes with very interesting rhythms) and no harmonic content to speak of. I'm sure that not all rap is like that, but the stuff that I was referring to definitely is.
 
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