Bass drum pulling overtones from toms...uhg

Chris Whitten

Well-known member
Please don't shoot for the v-drum tom sound, it is the least realistic sound on there.
Recordingwise, every time I play the bass drum or snare my toms ring. It adds a lot of tone and realism to the kit sound.
Of course your toms need to be nicely tuned, no horrible discordant tones.
Good internal balance helps. So positive playing of bass drum and snare (not meaning loud or hard), so they rise above the tom ring. Likewise, positive hits on the toms when they are played, so you don't have to have the tom mics high in your final mix.
In pro recording it is very common to mute the tom channels when they are not being played, or lower the level on the channels when the toms are not been played. That is the secret to success.
Over ringy toms is a much bigger problem playing live.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I would definitely tighten the BD reso boingy tight, like a high tympani note.

If free and quick. You could give that a try. It just may surprise you.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
That country drummer video did he state they use the "Nashville "number system or "National" number system-I've never heard of it??? Cool idea
 

pocket player

Junior Member
Gaff tape and thin felts, like these- stuck on the tape, then tape on the rim. Quick, easily applied and removed. Really work to tame unwanted overtones.
iu

They open on attack, then close quickly, allowing the drum attack and quieting the rest.

I have them on all my drums, they work as I need. Worth a try.
GREAT INFO, THANKS
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
I was getting sympathetic snare buzz from both my toms in my tiny drum space. I tightened up the reso heads like a snare and boom no more sympathetic buzz-but it is really dry and a shorter note. Since drums don't make pure tones it's easy to get sympathetic buzz or ringing. I'd try a tighter reso head as others suggested.
 

Philaiy9

Junior Member
How prominent is the resonance? Have you experienced it on other kits?

It sounds to me like it's normal, and I'll second the others who are saying it can be desirable.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
That country drummer video did he state they use the "Nashville "number system or "National" number system-I've never heard of it??? Cool idea
Nashville number system. For the pitched instruments, not drums so much. Take a chord progression in the key of "A" for instance. Say it's a 1-4-5 progression.

Now say you're in the key of "E". The 1-4-5 progression in "E" will obviously sound different in the key of "A".

So to use the NNS, I would say for example: It's a 1-6-2-5 progression in "F".

With a 1-4-5 chord progression the "1" is the key I'm in (aka the tonic), the 4 is a 4th of the tonic, the 5 is a fifth of the tonic.

In a 1-6-2-5 progression... the "1" would be the tonic, the "6" is a 6th of the tonic, the "2" is a 2nd of the tonic, and the 5 is the 5th of the tonic.

Great system. To over simplify, a person needs to know the key they are playing in, and where the 2nd chord, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, and 7th are located within that key
 
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GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Nashville number system. For the pitched instruments, not drums so much. Take a chord progression in the key of "A" for instance. Say it's a 1-4-5 progression.

Now say you're in the key of "E". The 1-4-5 progression in "E" will obviously sound different in the key of "A".

So to use the NNS, I would say for example: It's a 1-6-2-5 progression in "F".

With a 1-4-5 chord progression the "1" is the key I'm in (aka the tonic), the 4 is a 4th of the tonic, the 5 is a fifth of the tonic.

In a 1-6-2-5 progression... the "1" would be the tonic, the "6" is a 6th of the tonic, the "2" is a 2nd of the tonic, and the 5 is the 5th of the tonic.

Great system. To over simplify, a person needs to know the key they are playing in, and where the 2nd chord, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, and 7th are located within that key
Thanks Larry learn something new everyday- I think the idea is brilliant because simple elegance.
 

Chris Whitten

Well-known member
Some people tune to specific notes (in key), but that is going to be a hassle if recording multiple songs in different keys.
I prefer to just tune the toms sound they 1) sound good and 2) sound like a decent triad (or more) as a set.
 

Supergrobi

Technical Supervisor
Some people tune to specific notes (in key), but that is going to be a hassle if recording multiple songs in different keys.
I'm tuning to notes to get a nice tetrad, but explicitly not onto a fundamental the band plays. Otherwise mixing and mastering recordings could easily become a nightmare, e.g. if the note the bass plays is exactly the same as a lower tom - you'll end up with a resonating, indifferentiatable mud, hard to get under control in the mix, since bass and tom are on different channels, not triggering the same compressor.
 

deadletteroffice

Junior Member
Hey all, turns out gauze pads with gaff tape taped to the rims but not to the heads so they pop up when the tom is hit, but sit on the head when it's not being played (like the country video earlier in the thread) worked great. I really only needed it on the floor tom, but also put a square of it taped down to my snare head and love that sound in general. Issue resolved. Thanks for all the tips and opinions. Peace!
 

wraub

Well-known member
Hey all, turns out gauze pads with gaff tape taped to the rims but not to the heads so they pop up when the tom is hit, but sit on the head when it's not being played (like the country video earlier in the thread) worked great. I really only needed it on the floor tom, but also put a square of it taped down to my snare head and love that sound in general. Issue resolved. Thanks for all the tips and opinions. Peace!
:)
 

Fred D

Pioneer Member
Use a low cut filter and make cuts below 60 - 100 hz on you board or DAW on the tom's EQ. I had a similar problem and that cleaned it up.
 

KirbyM

Senior Member
Unfortunately, since drum manufacturers got rid of mufflers (or tone controls), this is what we are left with.
 

iCe

Senior Member
I have it too on my kit, but i'm not bothered by it. When i use my right bass drum, the 12 and 14'' start too resonate as well. I think that's mainly because i tune my (floor) toms as low as possible. But it isn't audible at all when playing a groove/song or when my guitar player start chugging away
 
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