Bass drum after market spings?

Herzeleid

Member
Are there different types of springs that happen to be tighter than stock ones?

My spring is way too lose on my DW 5000 even when tightening the spring tension.
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
You can buy new springs. Any drum shop should be able to hook you up. If they don't stock it, they'll definitely be able to order you one.

You're a new player though mate. Remember that. These things take time. Don't get into the habit of blaming the gear. It's a trap many of us have fallen into when we were learning. As long as the pedal is functional and in good working order, then I'll bet London to a brick that it's far more likely to be the foot than the spring. Keep chipping away. It'll come.

Replace it, by all means. But be aware that the problem may not be the spring at all. Where newer players are concerned, it so seldom is.
 

Herzeleid

Member
You can buy new springs. Any drum shop should be able to hook you up. If they don't stock it, they'll definitely be able to order you one.

You're a new player though mate. Remember that. These things take time. Don't get into the habit of blaming the gear. It's a trap many of us have fallen into when we were learning. As long as the pedal is functional and in good working order, then I'll bet London to a brick that it's far more likely to be the foot than the spring. Keep chipping away. It'll come.

Replace it, by all means. But be aware that the problem may not be the spring at all. Where newer players are concerned, it so seldom is.

It is the gear this time, because I can play way better on any other set because the spring used tends to feel a lot heavier and tighter so doubles and control feels a lot better.

I just want to develop good technique and practice comfortably
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
It is the gear this time,

I remember saying the exact same thing to my old man. He'd jump on the very same kit I was looking for excuses on and absolutely tear it apart. He'd hand me back my sticks and simply say "seems to work alright for me"

It was an excellent way of making the point. But it took a little while for it to sink in for me too. I was convinced if I had new/better/different gear, I'd be a better player. It's just not the case, honestly.


I just want to develop good technique and practice comfortably

Technique is the player, not the gear. A good player can transpose what he's doing from one pedal to another. Sure we all develop preferences and nuances as to how we want our gear set up, but a different spring never stopped anyone who had already developed the ability to do it in the first place. At this stage in your development you'll be better served just cracking on with it instead of looking for perceived problems as to why you can't.

Trust me mate, you have a good quality pedal. All you've gotta do is keep at it and develop the consistency and ability to do what you want with it. That ability comes with practice, not springs.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
I don't know if they still do, but at one time, DW did indeed sell an after market heavy duty spring for just such occasions.

I know at one point in way back land I bought them and put them on my then Pearl pedals.
 

Herzeleid

Member
I don't know if they still do, but at one time, DW did indeed sell an after market heavy duty spring for just such occasions.

I know at one point in way back land I bought them and put them on my then Pearl pedals.

Yeah thanks, because the drum set at my school (Yamaha Stage Custom Birch Advantage) got a new spring because someone broke it somehow, and the music teacher, says that the new one was an after market spring that felt tighter than before. It felt great, I didn't feel tense in the feet on legs what so ever, and it felt very smooth and responsive and doubles came nice and even. I even recorded my self and did a comparison and my timing and strokes sounded so much better at the schools set.
 

Herzeleid

Member
I remember saying the exact same thing to my old man. He'd jump on the very same kit I was looking for excuses on and absolutely tear it apart. He'd hand me back my sticks and simply say "seems to work alright for me"

It was an excellent way of making the point. But it took a little while for it to sink in for me too. I was convinced if I had new/better/different gear, I'd be a better player. It's just not the case, honestly.




Technique is the player, not the gear. A good player can transpose what he's doing from one pedal to another. Sure we all develop preferences and nuances as to how we want our gear set up, but a different spring never stopped anyone who had already developed the ability to do it in the first place. At this stage in your development you'll be better served just cracking on with it instead of looking for perceived problems as to why you can't.

Trust me mate, you have a good quality pedal. All you've gotta do is keep at it and develop the consistency and ability to do what you want with it. That ability comes with practice, not springs.

I can't when I keep tensing up.
 

Herzeleid

Member
I remember saying the exact same thing to my old man. He'd jump on the very same kit I was looking for excuses on and absolutely tear it apart. He'd hand me back my sticks and simply say "seems to work alright for me"

It was an excellent way of making the point. But it took a little while for it to sink in for me too. I was convinced if I had new/better/different gear, I'd be a better player. It's just not the case, honestly.




Technique is the player, not the gear. A good player can transpose what he's doing from one pedal to another. Sure we all develop preferences and nuances as to how we want our gear set up, but a different spring never stopped anyone who had already developed the ability to do it in the first place. At this stage in your development you'll be better served just cracking on with it instead of looking for perceived problems as to why you can't.

Trust me mate, you have a good quality pedal. All you've gotta do is keep at it and develop the consistency and ability to do what you want with it. That ability comes with practice, not springs.

But you have a point, I have filmed my technique on the bass drum and really experimented with it a lot. I just trying to adjust it to the point were I'm comfortable with the pedal, so learning and practicing is a lot easier. Because when I'm playing other sets with the bass drum pedals adjusted nicely, I play really good, ect. And when I get back home to play my set, I totally lose it with the bass drum because the other sets were more comfortable for me. Plus when I use my set I don't feel like I'm achieving my best out of it compared to playing with the other sets out there. I believe technique is the most important like you said, but being comfortable with it with what your playing physically is also very important.
 

axisT6

Senior Member
DW makes a heavy duty spring. I have this spring on all 4 of my pedals and swear by it. Then again, the way I play and the style I play necessitates the higher tension.

That said, before you change the springs, try positioning your beater farther back from the drum head. This put more stretch on the current spring when playing.
 
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