are actually rubber pads > mesh pads?

so ive got some doubts - i am the owner of roland td-15 with all pads being pdx-8. ive got this set like 3 months ago - it was a bit blind buy coz i was unable to go to any music store. while at first i really enjoyed that set, i noticed something what is if i remember called hotspotting and the more i played it, the more pads were feeling like not very dynamic. a week ago when i was in my friends house, i played his yamaha dtx522 and his sons dtx452 sets, and to be honest the rubber pads and that tcs snare on dtx522 just felt quite better, and i think i like them at least a bit more than mesh pads. and now my main doubt - are actually rubber/tcs pads somehow better in terms of triggering, or just something in my settings isn't right?
 

Doraemon

Well-known member
It's up to personal preference. Mesh pads can be tuned and there may be a few module settings you could try adjusting. Velocity curves can have a big effect on dynamics.
 

Iristone

Well-known member
PDX-8s are entry level mesh pads. Something like PD-85 or PDX-100 might feel even better than rubber pads.
 

Birdy

Well-known member
I’ve had low budget mesh pads and the tcs pads feel miles better to me. How they compare against top end mesh I don’t know as I’ve not tried any.
I’ve tried the rubber Yamaha tp pads which were ok, but think they’re nowhere near the feel and silence of the tcs pads.
 
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roncadillac

Member
I've not played rubber pads extensively (well... Outside of a normal practice pad of course) but a common complaint about them is wrist fatigue. Another common complaint, moreso from drummers who frequently alternate between acoustic and electric kits, is that rubber pads don't have the same feel. Rubber pads are known for being much more reliable and I've read several comments staying that the mid to higher end Yamaha rubber pads are made differently then most others providing a more 'natural' feel with less fatigue. At the end of the day it's really whatever you prefer. I play on two different Alesis mesh pad kits (more then my acoustic drums these days): one is the low end nitro and the other is a higher end crimson 2 SE. I've noticed a ton of both 'hot' and 'dead' spot issues on the nitro, it's annoying but I just use it for simple rehearsal so it's not a huge deal. The crimson 2 SE on the other hand is an absolute treat to play and though the 'hot' spots exist they are very minimal and overall the kit is extremely sensitive and dynamic. The only pad I'm having any trouble with on the crimson is the ride, it's got 3 zones plus a choke crammed into a 12" pad. It's not unplayable by any means but it can be annoying. I haven't yet taken the time to mess with the settings on that pad though so I'm sure I can 'fix' it.

With all of that said, I'll leave it at this: I've been considering switching to edrums for gigging more and more. The reliability of rubber pads is very appealing to me for that environment however my Crimson 2 would also be a completely serviceable option as well. I almost got the Yamaha dtx6k-x until I was able to get the crimson 2 SE brand new for $800 flat on a crazy one-day deal and I could not pass that up. I've really been enjoying playing my crimson 2 but I would think the Yamaha would be a bit more durable if I decided to gig it.
 

electrodrummer

Senior Member
Rubber:

1. As drummers we've been smacking rubber pads for decades as practice pads.
2. rubber pads all have different compounds and all feel different - even within the same manufacturer's ranges. A Yamaha TP80 is quite solid as is a Roland PD-7, whereas, say, a Yamaha TP120/SD is the nicest rubber pad by anyone, ever, and both feel different to my 1980s rubber pads in my avatar.
3. rubber has no real hot spotting issues.
4. rubber offers up to 3-zones on a pad (more even!)
5. pretty hard to break a rubber pad (no issues with wearing heads out /wearing out the foam cores/ etc).

It's all down to preference - but like mesh all feel different - so does rubber.

Oh - if you feel rubber is hard in your wrists, you're probably not using flexible sticks. Get maple in your size of preference:
Flex: maple > hickory > oak.
Been smacking rubber for over 3 decades and my wrists still work ;)
 
Rubber:

1. As drummers we've been smacking rubber pads for decades as practice pads.
2. rubber pads all have different compounds and all feel different - even within the same manufacturer's ranges. A Yamaha TP80 is quite solid as is a Roland PD-7, whereas, say, a Yamaha TP120/SD is the nicest rubber pad by anyone, ever, and both feel different to my 1980s rubber pads in my avatar.
3. rubber has no real hot spotting issues.
4. rubber offers up to 3-zones on a pad (more even!)
5. pretty hard to break a rubber pad (no issues with wearing heads out /wearing out the foam cores/ etc).

It's all down to preference - but like mesh all feel different - so does rubber.

Oh - if you feel rubber is hard in your wrists, you're probably not using flexible sticks. Get maple in your size of preference:
Flex: maple > hickory > oak.
Been smacking rubber for over 3 decades and my wrists still work ;)
im using hickory 7a from adams (netherland shop) and tbh i dont think that yamaha rubber is hard - dtx452k rubber feels a bit softer than dtx522k but both feel pretty good and just more dynamic - i tried editing velocity curves in td15 but still didnt feel as cool as dtx522k
 

Birdy

Well-known member
Is that tp120 a better feel than the tcs pad? If so I may get one….
 

electrodrummer

Senior Member
Is that tp120 a better feel than the tcs pad? If so I may get one….
Subjective, innit. It's the best rubber pad IMHO. But a different feel to a silicone pad. Down to you to try - only you can decide what's "best".
 

toddmc

Gold Member
To each their own but this is one of those rare times someone preferred rubber over mesh.

I played a TD6 for years with all rubber pads and never had issues with triggering (the cymbals were another issue) whereas I've had the odd hotspotting issue with mesh but the feel is way better (for me at least).

I guess consider yourself lucky- you prefer the feel of rubber pads plus you'll never have triggering issues
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
Answer... it depends.

Not all mesh pads or rubber pads are the same. Now, a properly tuned mesh pad (not too tight or loose) with the right settings can be very dynamic. If you hit too hard, it's really hard to get any epad dynamic.. the center cone CAN cause a hotspot if it is to sensitive, but hitting off by a half inch can fix that.. I say lower the sensitivity and try to hit very light to start. but having played both, both can be dynamic. Also using a VST tends to really help with this rather than the built in sounds.

Mesh can feel bouncy too. I prefer a deader pad as it won't hinder my playing on an acoustic kit as much.
 

electrodrummer

Senior Member
To each their own but this is one of those rare times someone preferred rubber over mesh.

I guess consider yourself lucky- you prefer the feel of rubber pads plus you'll never have triggering issues
Not that rare ;) I use rubber by default. (I have mesh stuff - there's one in my avatar - now unused somewhere - got fed up with the foam breaking down and mis-triggering and replacing heads. Got a full set of meshies in a box somewhere). Rubber is just *so* reliable - never busted any rubber pad in 35 years.

...but - as you say - each to their own. #NoRulesInDrumming.
 
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