A new idea for drum construction?

C. Dave Run

Gold Member
I would think the pores would be exposed more in a horizontal stave, making for better glue joints. That's just a guess.
I keep thinking about this and cant make up my mind.

End grain is vascular. That's why it absorbs more when you paint/stain it. It does the same thing with glue. Whether or not this makes for a stronger joint I dunno. Part of me says yes because the glue penetrates deeper and makes a bigger joint. Part of me says no for the same reason, because it makes for a thinner glue layer in said joint.
 

Cmdr. Ross

Silver Member
Not a bad thought. Take a bunch of re-rings & stack them to the shell depth you want.
Hmm...good project ideas coming my way. :unsure:;)
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
My dream snare would be a hollow-log or stave rosewood shell in a Sleishman rig. I have a cocobolo Vaughncraft steambent shell in a Sleishman rig, but I’d love to hear how hollow log would sound too.
 

motleyh

Senior Member
I keep thinking about this and cant make up my mind.

End grain is vascular. That's why it absorbs more when you paint/stain it. It does the same thing with glue. Whether or not this makes for a stronger joint I dunno. Part of me says yes because the glue penetrates deeper and makes a bigger joint. Part of me says no for the same reason, because it makes for a thinner glue layer in said joint.

This.

What makes good joints is full wood-to-wood contact, so end grain provides much less surface -- think of it as a bundle of straws, seen from the end of the bundle. Those openings not only drastically reduce surface material, but also let the glue penetrate instead staying on the surface to bond. It's possible to do end grain gluing, but it usually requires more steps in order to get those holes filled with semi-dried glue before finally gluing the pieces together. That's why segment shells are built in a brick-stacking design, so that any segment has face-grain contact with the rows above and below.

I've seen shells built using stave construction with horizontal grain; personally, I wouldn't do that or particularly recommend it.
 

Trigger

Senior Member
I will eat my snare drum if there was a noticeable difference in sound between this and a stave drum with the woodgrain running the other way.
 
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