Don Lamond
August 18, 1921 - December 23, 2003




Don Lamond

Don Lamond only recorded one album - Offbeat Percussion on Command - under his own name, but he was among the regular session players through most of the Command albums produced under Enoch Light's leadership.

Lamond grew up in Washington, DC, and began playing with professional big bands in 1943, starting with Sonny Durham and moving on to Boyd Raeburn, Woody Herman during the great Four Brothers era, Alvino Rey (briefly), ex-Herdsman Chubby Jackson, and finally, Elliot Lawrence in the early 1950s.

Lamond developed a reputation as an innovative, bebop-oriented drummer, and he can be heard on several classic bebop recordings, including Charlie Parker's "Relaxin' at Camarillo," Serge Chaloff's "Blue Serge," and guitarist Johnny Smith's "Moonlight in Vermont."

Around 1953, he settled in New York City and switched from touring to session work.

He spent most of the next twenty years performing on hundreds of jazz and popular recordings, playing for Benny Goodman, Bud Freeman, Joe Reisman, Maynard Ferguson, Bob Crosby, singer Lee Wiley, and many others.

His versatile drumming style made him a natural for Light's percussion showcase albums, and his name appears frequently in the liner notes of many of Command's first fifty albums. He moved to Florida in the early 1970s and played with the Top of the World band at Disney World when it first opened.




















Walter Hendl, Tony Aless, Billy Bauer, Chubby Jackson, Don Lamond,
Woody Herman and Flip Phillips, Carnegie Hall, New York, N.Y., Apr. 1946].














































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