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  #1  
Old 09-27-2013, 04:54 PM
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TColumbia37 TColumbia37 is offline
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Default Snare drum isolation

I'm looking for something to put some sort of shock absorber between the snare and the stand, to enhance the resonance. I've looked at 'Lil Booty Shakers, and FlexFrames. I really like the idea of the FlexFrame, but I wonder how sturdy the clips are, as I come down with some pretty hard rim shots.

Does anybody have experience with either of these products? Are there just replacements for the rubber for snare stands, similar to the pearl suspension feet for floor toms? I've seen a couple snare stands with pretty intricate isolation mounting built in, but those were fairly expensive.

I ask because I recently realized how much the tone of my snare was being choked due to the snare wires being so tight against the head. I backed them off a bit, and it REALLY opened up the tone in a way I've never heard before. I would imagine less transfer of vibration to the ground could only open it up more.

Last edited by TColumbia37; 09-27-2013 at 05:16 PM.
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Old 09-27-2013, 04:59 PM
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Default Re: Snare drum isolation

Gauger percussion have something like that for rack toms.
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Old 09-27-2013, 05:13 PM
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Default Re: Snare drum isolation

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Gauger percussion have something like that for rack toms.
Yeah, that's the FlexFrame
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Old 09-27-2013, 06:21 PM
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Default Re: Snare drum isolation

Hmmm, I've never needed a snare to resonate, so I'm not sure what iso mount would be appropriate. But remember, a snare is played differently than a tom, and you may not enjoy even the slightest floating feeling you'll get from a RIMS or frame suspension. I'm pretty sure even Tama gave up on their snare suspension mount/stand from several years back, it's not something drummers really need to do.

Bermuda
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Old 09-27-2013, 06:28 PM
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Jeremy Bender Jeremy Bender is offline
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Default Re: Snare drum isolation

I definitely agree with Bermuda, there's nothing more irritating to me than playing a rim click on the snare drum & having a 'giving away from underneath' feeling caused by the stand.
I recommend not tightening the basket too tight against the bottom hoop as well as buying a more resonant drum e.g. Joyful Noise snare drum or some similar shell construction drum instead.
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Old 09-27-2013, 06:37 PM
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Default Re: Snare drum isolation

Now that I think about it, a fdew companies have snare stands with sort of rubbery holders on the arms, claiming it helps isolate the drum, but I think that's aimed more at those who mount the rack tom on a snare stand. I don't know if that really does a lot of good though. There's so much marketing and hype and voodoo out there about "isolation" (lug gaskets, nylon rod washers, etc.) it's really hard to believe anything except as it pertains to toms, the drums you really need to resonate.

I say leave your snare alone.

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Old 09-27-2013, 06:42 PM
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Default Re: Snare drum isolation

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Originally Posted by Jeremy Bender View Post
I definitely agree with Bermuda, there's nothing more irritating to me than playing a rim click on the snare drum & having a 'giving away from underneath' feeling caused by the stand.
I recommend not tightening the basket too tight against the bottom hoop as well as buying a more resonant drum e.g. Joyful Noise snare drum or some similar shell construction drum instead.
I found a great sounding snare at my local Guitar Center that I really want. If only I could come up with the money quickly. My snare is great for nearly every application but the one that I seem to be needing it for the most. I should just bite the bullet and buy it

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Originally Posted by bermuda View Post
Hmmm, I've never needed a snare to resonate, so I'm not sure what iso mount would be appropriate. But remember, a snare is played differently than a tom, and you may not enjoy even the slightest floating feeling you'll get from a RIMS or frame suspension. I'm pretty sure even Tama gave up on their snare suspension mount/stand from several years back, it's not something drummers really need to do.

Bermuda
That's what seems to be the common consensus. I've dabbled in a RIMS type mount on a snare before (for a completely different reason) and I didn't so much mind it, but I don't want one on my snare. The dilemma I'm running into now is that I play in two bands, and only own one decent snare. I need something very resonant for the ska band, but something a little more controlled for the punk band, and really every other application. I figured if I had something easily removable, I could use it to get that extra resonance when I've got a ska gig, and then take it off after. It does look like Tama stopped making that stand. That one seems kind of like overkill to me, anyhow. I should probably just look into a second snare.
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Old 09-27-2013, 07:18 PM
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Default Re: Snare drum isolation

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Originally Posted by TColumbia37 View Post
IThe dilemma I'm running into now is that I play in two bands, and only own one decent snare. I need something very resonant for the ska band, but something a little more controlled for the punk band...
The classic and new Ska snare sounds don't come from a resonant snare, it's just a matter tuning and lack of damping. If you have a metal snare, you're halfway there. The edges are smooth and true, and allow most heads to sing (I suppose that could be interpreted as resonance.) make sure the edge is clean, and avoid using a 2-ply or thick batter - 10mil (a G1 or Ambassador weight) will sing nicely and hold up fairly well, even under heavy rim playing.

As for other genres and sounds, you can simply pad the drum as needed. Eventually you will find use for different snares, but tuning, head selection, wires and tension, and how you play the drum, have more to do with the resulting sound than the drum itself or how it's mounted. You should be able to accomplish a lot with a single, good quality snare.

Bermuda
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Old 09-27-2013, 07:35 PM
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Default Re: Snare drum isolation

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Originally Posted by bermuda View Post
The classic and new Ska snare sounds don't come from a resonant snare, it's just a matter tuning and lack of damping. If you have a metal snare, you're halfway there. The edges are smooth and true, and allow most heads to sing (I suppose that could be interpreted as resonance.) make sure the edge is clean, and avoid using a 2-ply or thick batter - 10mil (a G1 or Ambassador weight) will sing nicely and hold up fairly well, even under heavy rim playing.

As for other genres and sounds, you can simply pad the drum as needed. Eventually you will find use for different snares, but tuning, head selection, wires and tension, and how you play the drum, have more to do with the resulting sound than the drum itself or how it's mounted. You should be able to accomplish a lot with a single, good quality snare.

Bermuda
I've got an Ambassador X (14 mil, I think) because they were out of Ambassadors, over a Hazy Ambassador, with PureSound Custom wires. Birch snare. I never use dampening, and keep it tuned pretty high. I guess it really isn't 'resonance' as I stated, but longer head sustain, I guess? I still get the two mixed up from time to time. I was considering getting a metal snare. I've also found that maple or birch 13 x 7-ish gets the sound I'm looking for.

Also, my snare is 14 x 5.5, and the bearing edges are in pretty much the same shape that they were when I got it new. 45 degree edges, I do believe.

Last edited by TColumbia37; 09-27-2013 at 07:52 PM.
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Old 09-27-2013, 08:52 PM
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Default Re: Snare drum isolation

The birch drum should be fine, but change the thick head, and don't tune it too high, you'll choke out the ring*. Also, for maximum ring, the 14" will be better than the 13". The more head area, the more it will vibrate, and the more it will ring. Consider how a 10" tom decay is so much shorter than a 20" bass drum. the difference between the 13 & 14" will be noticeable.

For tuning, make sure both heads are tuned very evenly (around the lugs) for maximum tone & decay.

Bermuda


* Ever hear how Guitar Center's snares are tuned? Don't do that!
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  #11  
Old 09-27-2013, 09:19 PM
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Default Re: Snare drum isolation

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Originally Posted by bermuda View Post
The birch drum should be fine, but change the thick head, and don't tune it too high, you'll choke out the ring*. Also, for maximum ring, the 14" will be better than the 13". The more head area, the more it will vibrate, and the more it will ring. Consider how a 10" tom decay is so much shorter than a 20" bass drum. the difference between the 13 & 14" will be noticeable.

For tuning, make sure both heads are tuned very evenly (around the lugs) for maximum tone & decay.

Bermuda


* Ever hear how Guitar Center's snares are tuned? Don't do that!
I agree with Bermuda.

I use Remo clear Diplomat hazy 2 mil for the reso/snare head. Very thin.
I use Remo coated Ambassador 10 mil for the batter.
I would use Remo coated Diplomat 7.5 mil for the batter except I hit pretty hard so I'm worried about damaging the 7.5 mil head.

All these are single ply heads. I like my snare drum as sensitive as I can get it.
Try it, you'll like it.
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Old 09-27-2013, 09:33 PM
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Default Re: Snare drum isolation

And hit off-center.

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  #13  
Old 09-27-2013, 09:59 PM
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Default Re: Snare drum isolation

Quote:
Originally Posted by bermuda View Post
The birch drum should be fine, but change the thick head, and don't tune it too high, you'll choke out the ring*. Also, for maximum ring, the 14" will be better than the 13". The more head area, the more it will vibrate, and the more it will ring. Consider how a 10" tom decay is so much shorter than a 20" bass drum. the difference between the 13 & 14" will be noticeable.

For tuning, make sure both heads are tuned very evenly (around the lugs) for maximum tone & decay.

Bermuda


* Ever hear how Guitar Center's snares are tuned? Don't do that!
That makes sense. I think the big difference I was hearing was in the depth, but I could be wrong.

And yeah, I always have to tune their drums before I try them out. They have a couple of competent drummers there, but they only take the time to tune the most expensive display kit on the floor at the time.

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Originally Posted by Hollywood Jim View Post
I agree with Bermuda.

I use Remo clear Diplomat hazy 2 mil for the reso/snare head. Very thin.
I use Remo coated Ambassador 10 mil for the batter.
I would use Remo coated Diplomat 7.5 mil for the batter except I hit pretty hard so I'm worried about damaging the 7.5 mil head.

All these are single ply heads. I like my snare drum as sensitive as I can get it.
Try it, you'll like it.
.
.
.
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I may want to try the Diplomat on top as well as on bottom. The thinner the head on my snare, the more I like it. I can hit very hard at times, but I've never busted through an Ambassador yet.

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And hit off-center.

2020202
That does give a nice ring. I do it from time to time, but I haven't learned to get it consistently enough. I just default to the center of the head.
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  #14  
Old 09-27-2013, 10:23 PM
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Default Re: Snare drum isolation

Most of the snares I ;listen to have the snares cranked to tight and they are choking the sound. My snares are tighten to the point where it just stops sounding rattly(word?)You would be surprised at how much better your snares will sound if you loosen them up a bit.a
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Old 09-28-2013, 08:12 AM
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Default Re: Snare drum isolation

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Originally Posted by GRUNTERSDAD View Post
Most of the snares I ;listen to have the snares cranked to tight and they are choking the sound. My snares are tighten to the point where it just stops sounding rattly(word?)You would be surprised at how much better your snares will sound if you loosen them up a bit.a
That's what I just did, recently. It's so much better.
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